Berta Gerzonová, her experiences of Auschwitz-Birkenau

Metadata

Berta Gerzonová recalls several days in autumn 1944, when she was deported from the Terezín Ghetto to Auschwitz-Birkenau and then to other camps. In a literary style, she describes the transport to Auschwitz-Birkenau and the shock that inmates experienced upon their arrival. Gerzonová recounts in detail the harsh ordeals that she had to go through in order to survive.

zoom_in
4

Document Text

  1. English
  2. Czech
insert_drive_file
Text from page1

Statement

Written with Berta Gerzonová, born 10. 1. 1921, residing in Prague 1., Dlouhá St. 46, former prisoner of the concentration camps: Theresienstadt, Auschwitz, Flossenbürgework commando Oederan, Jewish nationality, profession clerk.

October 23rd, 1944. The day we boarded the transport. We had already come to terms with the fact that the same hardships and suffering that thousands and thousands of our sisters and brothers had gone through now awaited us. We didn’t know where they would take us, we only knew that it would be worse and far more terrible than what we had already experienced. We were ready for the transport. The same day that we marched past Rahm, we started to get our things ready and pack. We sorted, packed, and then sorted and packed some more. Practically the entire staff of the home was leaving, and so we also had to take care of the children. Our luggage and the things we wanted to take with us were finally ready. And we had a lot. We had planned for the eventuality that our luggage wouldn’t get there in one piece, or wouldn’t get there at all, and we took so many things with us we could barely move them. Winter is coming and we mustn’t go bare, we told ourselves and so we put on underwear, dresses, several blouses and sweaters, skirts, coats, and on top of all that, if we had one, a work suit. Three pairs of socks, warm socks, and sturdy shoes. If the luggage got lost, this would last us at least a year and then, God willing, hopefully, hopefully our suffering would end. We were finally ready and prepared, which meant that we had to go to the barracks. The train was ready. The remaining children loaded the luggage onto a cart and we went to the Hamburg barracks. There, we handed in our luggage and then went into the barracks. I wrote down my name and the number that was on the board hanging around my neck. Then we went upstairs into the reserved rooms. They were almost full. There were mostly women and children there. Mostly children, because almost all of the orphans were leaving with the remaining Jügendfürsorge staff. There are children of all ages. The smaller ones were with their caregivers. We were moved to tears. Not because of our plight, but because of the children whose fate was certain death. That night, we managed to get out of the barracks. I walked once more through Theresienstadt and said goodbye to the places where life was hard, but we got used to it. I returned to the barracks and layed down, fully clothed, on my pallet to sleep for a little while.

At 7 o’clock in the morning — boarding time. We entered basically according to our numbers. We had children from our home in our care, with whom we had experienced so much worry yet so much joy as well. They were about 60 of them and some older foster children and their mothers were with us as well. We managed to persuade the Transportleitung to give us a carriage for the children and caregivers. At the last minute, they added several elderly people, who made our difficult trip even harder. There were 71 of us in the carriage, besides the suitcases, bags, and other luggage. We sat, tightly packed in, one right next to the other. In the middle, they left a little space for a bottle of water and a bucket. We departed from Theresienstadt and waited in Bohušovice for more people to board the transport and for departure. The carriage was a cattle car. They sealed the doors and wired the windows shut except for a small slit. It was extremely hot and humid in the carriage. We soon realized that we wouldn’t be able to breathe. The carriage was overcrowded with people, and the bucket, containing excrement that we couldn’t empty out, added to the oppressive air. As soon as the train would stop, soldiers would patrol around it. We asked them if we could open the window a little. They didn’t allow it. We had no choice but to help ourselves. By some coincidence, someone had

insert_drive_file
Text from page2

a pair of pliers. While the train was in motion, we loosened the wires until we could finally open the window. As soon as the train stopped, we pushed the window back into place and hid the wires so well that the patrol didn’t notice that they were loose. We managed to fool them for a long time. On the side where the children were sitting by the window and had done the same to it, the wire fell out of the window. The patrol found it and flew into a rage. We had to close the windows because they were threatening to shoot us. The air in the carriage was unbearable, and we opened the window again as soon as the train started moving.

We finished the bottle of water (5 liters) that we had brought with us from Theresienstadt. When the train would stop we would beg the SSmen to allow us to fetch some water somewhere. Of course, they forbade it. The children in the carriage were crying because they were thirsty, and so we sat and entertained the children to help them forget. We began to dream of a time when we were allowed to drink enough water, although we lacked so many other things. Many of us were overcome with nostalgia: Dear Theresienstadt. There, we were at least allowed to drink water. After we’d been on the train for over 24 hours, we turned our attention to the direction it was going in. We found out that we were going east. We saw Gleiwitz, Hindenburg, the edges of mines and factories. We guessed that we were headed for Birkenau. In our imaginations, it was a ghetto, not as organized and perfect as Theresienstadt, but still a ghetto, because we had received letters from there from our friends and relatives. In the evening, on the second day of our ride, we arrived at the Birkenau station and our hearts skipped a beat out of happiness. We thought about our loved ones who were here. We imagined that we would see them, maybe some of them would be waiting at the station for us. We were very disappointed when we rode through the station without stopping. We withheld this from the others to keep them calm. We rode through the Auschwitz station. We looked through the slits of the window that we closed immediately afterwards because we expected the train to stop at any minute. Those of us sitting by the window were gripped with terror after reading the names of the stations, but we remained silent to keep the others from finding out. The train stopped and then started to move in the opposite direction. It was completely quiet in the carriage, but then someone suddenly said: Auschwitz. If a bomb had exploded, it couldn’t have set off a greater panic. The women wailed and cried; the men screamed. The children were terrified. We looked through the slits in the window. We saw a lit yard with buildings surrounded by an electric fence. Every 5 meters there was an electric lamp. A concentration camp — electric fence. Lord, help us, I want to be anywhere except between these wires. We wanted to run away, hide somewhere. But we couldn’t. We were locked in the carriage, there were patrols outside who were shooting. The train stopped. It was quiet outside, we could only hear the patrols’ footsteps, and inside the carriage — darkness and sheer panic. Then we heard them opening the carriages next to ours, we heard Yiddish being spoken. Our hope surged when we saw that there were Jews there. Suddenly, an order: everything out, the luggage stays in the carriages. The men exited separately. We took the children by the hand and left the train. Women and children moved forward. An SSman stood at the crossing and waved his cane this way and that. And we saw people going either left or right depending on the direction he waved his cane in. Children and old people on one side, young people on the other. I finally came to stand before the SSman: Ist das ihr Kind? When I told him no, he asked me how old the child was and waved his cane to the right. As I went, I turned around to look for my sister. Thank God, she was behind me. They made us stand in 5 rows and then we started walking. In about 10 minutes, we veered off the path and found ourselves among a tangle of wires near brick buildings and a mound of luggage. We were eager and impatient and asked the SSman questions. He answered brusquely, but we managed to learn something. We would apparently be reunited with our families. But first we had to make our way immediately to the baths and our things had to be disinfected. They took us to a large, cold room. They took away our bread bags in which we had our last supply of food. There were women here as well, who were, unlike the men who were dressed in striped clothing and plate-shaped hats, dressed like civilians except that they had a red line on their backs. We weren’t wearing a Jewish star. Several SSmen enter, among them the one we knew from the train station. We were ordered to take off our clothes. We took off our coats and waited. They shouted at us to speed it up, the Obersturmführer was waiting. We protested and said that there were men in the room. They shouted and beat us. And so we had to strip off our clothes. We were allowed to keep our

insert_drive_file
Text from page3

shoes, but not on our feet, we had to hold them in our hands. We stand in line in front of a bench where they removed our rings, watches, and jewels both valuable and worthless. We stood in rows, naked, and saw our things, which we had set on the ground in piles, being thrown around. The women and men who worked there flung themselves upon them like hyenas and picked off the things they needed. When we protested, they shouted at us and beat us and we realized that the only thing that still belonged to us was our life. After we showered we would apparently get new clothing. We marched, undressed, before the SSman, who sent the weaker ones aside. In another room, they took away our hair clips and combs. There were several women there with shaving equipment. We thought they would cut some of our hair off for reasons of hygiene. A fat woman stood by the window talking with another dressed in an SS uniform. We saw SS women for the first time in our lives. One of the female employees asked her something. We heard: Alles herunter. And we saw the first in line get her head shaved, her hair falling to the floor. In a moment, a beautiful, cultured woman was transformed into something that resembled an ape. And so it went, one after another. After I was altered in this way, I looked around for my sister. Although it was not allowed, I walked around the room several times until I heard her voice. We went into another room to shower. We held our shoes in our hands like they were the most valuable thing, because they were the only things of ours that we had left. Several men and women had already tried to take them from us or exchange something for them. They told us that the Germans would take them from us. But we didn’t give them away. We still hoped that we could at least hold on to our shoes. So they wouldn’t get stolen, we took them with us to the showers. Better wet than not at all. We had no soap to wash ourselves with, nor towels to dry ourselves off. The water ran sometimes lukewarm and sometimes ice cold. We left the showers wet and stood in another cold room and waited to see what would happen. We were desperate, we were cold, we were devastated and powerless. And so we concentrated on what awaited us. Clothing. How ironic. They brought us a bag of rags. Dust billowed as they threw it on the ground. They gave us dresses, summer clothes, dirty and torn and not enough to cover our naked bodies. We supposedly didn’t need underwear. They also gave us coats, dirty, and either too big or too small, all torn. They originally didn’t want to give us socks. But we begged for them and they relented. But they purposefully gave us mismatched pairs. They paired a grey one with a black one, a white with a brown, etc. They gave us a dirty rag to cover our heads with. Instead of shoes, we got a pair of wooden slippers, each in a different size and of varying quality. Thus equipped, we entered another room, which we were told we’d be sleeping in. There was nothing inside except for the cold stone floor. Tired as we were, we sat down on the floor, but couldn’t sleep. We were freezing and lacked pants or a shirt. We were alone for a moment. Then some men entered, and we complained to them. Some do-gooders came forward who were willing to acquire clothes for us, but for a price that I can’t bring myself to discuss. Unfortunately, some of us were willing to pay this price. And so we witnessed terrible things that we will never be able to forget. For a piece of bread, for a shirt or a pair of pants, for a cigarette, all things that were unattainable to us, they went into the bathrooms with the men. One of the bathemployees guarded the doors. They returned with a piece of bread or an item of clothing. It was enough information for us to realize the situation we were in. We spent our first night in Auschwitz on a stone floor, in the dirt, cold, and exposed to prostitution.

In the morning, they took us beyond the electric fence to other electric fences, where we went hungry and stood during roll calls for 4 days and nights until they took us, physically and mentally destroyed, through another selection, to Germany to work for our parentsmurderers and manufacture munitions that would be used against our friends.

Berta Gerzonová

insert_drive_file
Text from page4

Statement accepted by:

B. Gerzonová

Signature of witnesses:

Helena Schicková

Alex. Schmiedt

On behalf of the Documentation Campaign:

19. XI. 1945 Scheck

On behalf of the archive:

Alex. Schmiedt

insert_drive_file
Text from page1

Protokol

Sepsaný s Bertou Gerzonovou, nar. 10. 1. 1921, bytem v Praze 1., Dlouhá tř. 46, bývalým vězněmkoncentračních táborů: Terezín, Osvětim, Flossenbürgepracovní komando Oederan, národnosti židovské, povoláním úřednice.

23. října 1944. Den našeho nástupu do transportu. Už jsme se smířili s myšlenkou, že i nás čekají trampoty a strádání, které před námi již prodělalo tisíce a tisíce našich sester a bratří. Nevíme, kam nás povezou, víme jen, že nás čeká něco horšího, strašnějšího, než jsme prodělali dosud. Na transport jsme připravené. Ještě v ten den, kdy jsme defilovaly před Rahmem, začali jsme s chystáním věcí a balením. Třídilo, balilo a zase třídilo a balilo. Jel skoro celý zbylý personál domova, takže jsme se museli ještě trochu postarat o děti. Konečně jsme měli připravená zavazadla a věci jsme chtěly vzít na sebe. Nebylo toho málo. Počítali jsme s možností, že zavazadla nedojdou v pořádku, nebo, že nedojdou vůbec a braly jsme na sebe tolik věcí, že jsme se skoro nemohly pohnout. Blíží se zima a nemůžeme přece zůstat nahé, řekly jsme si a brali na sebe troje prádlo, šaty, několik blůz a svetrů, sukni, kabát a přes všechno, pokud jsme měli, ještě pracovní oblek. Troje punčochy, teplé ponožky, a ještě pevné boty. Kdyby nedošla zavazadla, vystačily bychom s tím nejméně na rok a pak, dej bůh, snad, snad bude již konec těm útrapám. Konečně jsme hotové se všemi přípravami, a to znamená zároveň taky již nástup do kasáren. Vagonová souprava byla již připravena. Nakládáme pomocí zbylých dětí zavazadla na vozík a jdeme k Hamburským kasárnám. Tam odevzdáváme zavazadla a jdeme do kasáren. Zapisují si jméno a číslo, které máme na tabulce pověšené kolem krku. Pak jdeme nahoru do vykázaných místností. Je tam už skoro plno. Jsou zde vesměs ženy a děti, hlavně děti, protože zároveň se zbylým personálem Jügendfürsorge odjíždí skoro všichni sirotci. Jsou zde děti v každém stáří. Menší jsou se svými opatrovnicemi. Je nám do pláče. Ne kvůli nám, ale kvůli dětem, které jedou do jisté smrti. V noci se nám podařilo dostat se ještě ven z kasáren. Jdu ještě jednou Terezínem a loučím se s místy, kde se sice nežilo dobře, na které ale člověk během doby přivykl. Vracím se zpět do kasáren a lehám si oblečená na kavalec, abych si ještě trochu zdřímla.

V 7 h ráno – nástup. Jdeme přibližně podle čísel. Bereme si na starost děti z našeho domova, s kterými jsme prodělaly již tolik starostí a taky tolik hezkých chvil. Je jich asi 60 a jdou s námi taky nějaké chovanky starší se svými matkami. Prosadili jsme u Transportleitung, že nám dají vagon pro děti a opatrovnice, v poslední chvíli nám však tam ještě nacpali pár starých lidí, kteří nám i tak již dost těžkou cestu ještě stěžovali. Je nás ve vagoně 71 osob, mimo kufry, tašky a jiná zavazadla. Sedíme těsně, jeden vedle druhého. Uprostřed udělali trochu místa pro láhev s vodou a vědro. Vyjíždíme z Terezína a v Bohušovicích čekáme na doplnění transportu a na odjezd. Vagon je dobytčí. Dveře zaplombovali a okna, až na malou štěrbinu zadrátovali. Ve vagoně je strašné dusno. Brzy cítíme, že nebude možno za chvíli dýchat. Vagon je přecpaný lidma a vědro s výkaly, které nemáme možnost vyprázdnit, přispívá k tomu svým dílem. Jakmile vlak zastaví, chodí kolem hlídka. Prosíme, aby nám bylo dovoleno otevřít trochu okno. Nedovolí. Nezbývá nám nic jiného, než abychom si pomohli sami. Náhodou má někdo s sebou

insert_drive_file
Text from page2

kleště. Uvolňujeme během jízdy dráty a konečně jsme tak daleko, že můžeme okno otevřít. Jakmile se vlak zastaví, přišoupneme okno a maskuje dráty tak, aby hlídka nepoznala, že jsou uvolněné. Delší dobu se nám to daří. Na straně, kde sedí u okna děti, a kde dělaly totéž, vypadl z okna drát. Našla jej hlídka a spustila rámus. Museli jsme okna zavřít, protože hrozili zastřelením. Vzduch ve voze byl k nesnesení, a proto jsme, jakmile se vlak zase rozjel, otevřeli okno znovu. Byli jsme pak už velmi opatrní.

Dopili jsme láhev vody, kterou jsme si vezli s sebou do Terezína /Bylo to 5l/. Na zastávkách jsme prosili SSáky, aby nám dovolili nabrat někde vodu. Samozřejmě, že nedovolili. Ve vagonu byly děti a plakaly žízní. A tak sedíme a bavíme děti, aby zapomněly a sníme o časech, kdy nám bylo dovoleno napít se aspoň dosti vody, i když jsme jiné věci postrádali. A nejeden si zasteskl: Zlatý Terezín. Tam jsme směli aspoň vodu pít. Jsme ve vlaku již přes 24 hodin a obracíme svou pozornost ke směru jízdy. Zjišťujeme, že jedeme na východ. Vidíme Gleiwitz, Hindenburg, kraj dolů a továren. Tipujeme, že jedeme do Birkenau. V našich představách je to ghetto, sice ne tak organizované a výstavní jako Terezín, ale podle všeho přece jen ghetto, protože jsme odsud dostali dopisy od svých známých a příbuzných. Večer, druhého dne jízdy. Vjíždíme do stanice Birkenau a srdce nám poskočí radostí. Myslíme na své drahé, které tam máme. Představujeme si, že je tam uvidíme, snad některý z nich bude na stanici na nás čekat. Ale jak jsme zklamáni, když projíždíme tou stanicí a vlak nezastaví. Aby ve vagoně nevznikla panika, zamlčujeme tento fakt. Projíždíme stanicí Auschwitz. Díváme se ze štěrbiny okna, které jsme zase zatáhli, protože očekáváme každým okamžikem zastavení vlaku. Nás u okna pojala hrůza po přečtení jména na stanici, ale mlčíme, aby o tom nevěděli ti druzí. Vlak zastaví a za chvíli se zase rozjíždí opačným směrem. Ve voze je úplné ticho, když náhle někdo pronese: Auschwitz. Kdyby byla vybuchla puma, nemohlo to způsobit větší paniku. Ženy naříkají a pláčou, muži křičí. Děti jsou vyděšené. Díváme se štěrbinou ven z okna. Vidíme osvětlený terén, s baráky a kolem dokola dráty s elektrickým napětím. Každých 5 metrů elektrická lampa. Koncentrák, dráty s elektrickým napětím. Bože, pomoz, všude chci být, jen ne mezi těmi dráty. Chtěli bychom utíkat, někam se schovat. Nemůžeme, jsme zavřeni ve vagonu, venku jsou hlídky, které střílí. Vlak zastaví. Venku je ticho, slyšíme jen kroky hlídek a vagoně tma a strašná panika. Pak slyšíme, že otvírají již vedlejší vagony, slyšíme mluvit jidiš. Máme ještě naději, když vidíme, že tam jsou Židé. Náhle rozkaz: Všechno ven, zavazadla zůstanou ve vagonech. Muži nastoupí zvlášť. Bereme za ruku děti a vystupujeme. Ženydětmi se pohybují kupředu. Na rozcestí stojí SSák a mává holí sem a tam. A vidíme, že podle mávnutí hole jdou lidé buďto nalevo, nebo napravo. Na jednu stranu děti, starší lidé, na druhou stranu mladí. Dostávám se před SSáka: Ist das ihr Kind? Kdy mu říkám, že ne, ptá se mě na stáří a mávne holí napravo. Jdu a ohlížím se po sestře. Chvála bohu, jde za mnou. Postaví nás do 5ti stupu a jdeme. Asi za 10 minut se dostáváme z cesty mezi spleť drátů, kde jsou zděné barák a haldy zavazadel. Jsme nedočkavé a netrpělivé a vyptáváme se SSáka. Odpovídá nevrle, ale něco se přece dovídáme. S rodinou se prý shledáme. Musíme ale nejdříve do lázní a naše věci do desinfekce. Vedou nás do velké, studené místnosti. Odebírají nám chlebníky, ve kterých máme poslední zásoby jídel. Jsou tam i ženy, které jsou na rozdíl od mužů, kteří mají na sobě páskované oblečení a talířovité čepice, civilně oblečeny, jen na zádech mají červený pruh. Postrádáme židovskou hvězdu. Vejde několik SSáků, mezi nimi náš známý z nádraží. Dostáváme rozkaz se svléknout. Sundáváme kabáty a čekáme. Rozkřiknou se na nás, abychom dělaly rychle, Obersturmführer, že čeká. Protestujeme a poukazujeme na to, že jsou v místnosti muži. Křičí, bijí nás. Musíme se tedy svléknout. Smíme si ponechat jen

insert_drive_file
Text from page3

boty, a to ne na nohou, držíme je v ruce. Jdeme v řadě k lavici, kde nám odebírají prsteny, hodinky a šperky, ať už cenné nebo bezcenné. Stojíme nahé v řadě a vidíme, že naše věci, které jsme uložili na zem v hromádkách, se přehazují. Jak hyeny se na to vrhnou ženy a muži, kteří tam pracují a vybírají si věci, které se jim hodí. Když protestujeme, řvou a bijí a tu se dovídáme, že nám nepatří již nic než holý život. Po koupeli prý dostaneme nové šatstvo. Defilujeme svlečené před SSákem, který posílá slabé stranou. V další místnosti nám odebírají sponky z vlasů a hřebínky. Je tam několik žen s holícími aparáty. Myslíme, že nám ustřihnou část vlasů z hygienických důvodů. U okna stojí tlustá žena a baví se s jinou v uniformě SSáka. Vidíme poprvé v životě ženy, SSačky. Jedna ze zaměstnankyň se jí na něco ptá. Slyšíme: Alles herunter. A již vidíme, jak první z nás zajíždějí strojkem do vlasů, jak vlasy padají na zem. A za chvíli je z hezké a pěstěné ženy tvor podobný opici. Tak to jde dále, jedna za druhou. Když jsem byla takhle okrášlena, rozhlížím se po sestře. Vzdor zákazu projdu několikrát místností, až ji poznávám po známém hlase. Jdeme do další místnosti pod sprchy. Boty držíme v ruce jako cennost, protože je to to jediné, co nám zbylo. Již několik mužů a žen se pokoušelo je nám odebrat nebo vyměnit. Že nám je Němci stejně seberou. Ale my je nedáváme, stále doufáme, že si aspoň ty boty uchováme. Aby nám je neukradli, bereme je s sebou pod sprchy. Ať jsou raději mokré, než abychom je neměli vůbec. Mýdlo na umytí nemáme, ani ručníky na utření. Voda je chvílema vřelá, chvilkama ledová. Mokré, jak jsme odešly ze sprch, stojíme v další studené místnosti a čekáme, co bude dále. Jsme zoufalé, je nám zima, jsme zničeny a bezmocny. Proto se soustřeďujeme na další události. Ošacení. Jaká ironie. Donesli balík hader, z kterého se prášilo, když ho hodili na zem. Dávají šaty, letní hadry, špinavé a roztrhané, které v mnoha případech nestačily ani na to, aby přikryly nahotu. Prádlo prý nepotřebujeme. Dále nám dávají kabátky, špinavé, nemožně velké nebo malé, roztrhané. Punčochy nám nechtěli původně dát. Pak jsme si je ale vyprosily. A úmyslně vybírají každou jinou. Párují šedou s černou, bílou s hnědou, a podobně. Na holou hlavu nám dávají kus špinavého hadru. A místo bot dostáváme pár dřevěných pantoflí, každý jiné velikosti a kvality. Tak vybavené jdeme do další místnosti, kterou nám poukázali na přenocování. Nebylo tam nic než studená, kamenná podlaha. Unavené, jak jsme byly, sedly jsme si na podlahu. Spát jsme nemohly. Mrzly jsme a strašně jsme postrádaly pár kalhot, košili. Chvíli jsme měly klid. Přišli muži, kterým jsme si stěžovaly. Našli se dobrodinci, kteří byli ochotni opatřit té nebo jiné nějaké prádlo, ovšem za cenu, o které se zde nemohu rozepisovat. Bohužel se našly některé, které byly ochotny si to zaopatřit i za tuto cenu. A tak jsme byli svědky ošklivých scén, které se nám vryly snad doživotně do paměti. Za kousek chleba, za košili nebo kalhoty, za cigaretu, vše věci, které byly pro nás nedosažitelné, šlo se s chlapy na záchod, jehož dveře byly hlídány jedním ze zaměstnanců lázní. A ven vyšly ozbrojené kouskem chleba nebo nějakým prádlem. Stačilo nám to, abychom si udělaly obraz o situaci, v jaké jsme byly. Na kamenné podlaze, v zimě, špíně a prostitucí jsme strávily naší první noc v Osvětímě.

Ráno nás odvedli mezi ostnatými dráty, nabitými elektřinou, do dalších drátů, kde jsme prohladověly a prostály na apelech další 4 dny a noci, aby nás potom tělesně a duševně zničené, když jsme prošly další selekcí, odvezli do Německa, abychom tam pracovaly pro ty, kteří byli vrahy našich rodičů a vyráběly munici proti těm, kteří byli našimi přáteli.

Berta Gerzonová

insert_drive_file
Text from page4

Protokol přijala:

B. Gerzonová

Podpis svědků:

Helena Schicková

Alex. Schmiedt

Za Dokumentační akci přijal:

19. XI. 1945 Scheck

Za archiv přijal:

Alex. Schmiedt

References

  • Updated 10 months ago
The Czech lands (Bohemia, Moravia and Czech Silesia) were part of the Habsburg monarchy until the First World War, and of the Czechoslovak Republic between 1918 and 1938. Following the Munich Agreement in September 1938, the territories along the German and Austrian frontier were annexed by Germany (and a small part of Silesia by Poland). Most of these areas were reorganized as the Reichsgau Sudetenland, while areas in the West and South were attached to neighboring German Gaue. After these terr...
This collection originated as a documentation of the persecution and genocide of Jews in the Czech lands excluding the archival materials relating to the history of the Terezín ghetto, which forms a separate collection. The content of the collection comprises originals, copies and transcripts of official documents and personal estates, as well as prints, newspaper clippings, maps, memoirs and a small amount of non-written material. The Documents of Persecution collection is a source of informati...