Erich Nasch, on the deportation of his family to the Terezín Ghetto and Auschwitz-Birkenau

Metadata

Detailed, personal report about the fate of Erich Nasch and his family during World War II. Nasch mainly focuses on their deportation to the Terezín Ghetto and to Auschwitz-Birkenau. He highlights the life story of his wife and little son, who were murdered in the gas chambers of Auschwitz-Birkenau.

zoom_in
15

Document Text

  1. English
  2. German
insert_drive_file
Text from page1

I Saw It

You want to know, you should know. I have seen it, heard it, experienced it, I want to write it down for you without adding anything, without concealing anything.

When our homeland was occupied by Hitler and transformed into a German protectorate, we lived in Brno. I was a doctor in a Sanatorium in Brno, and my wife helped my mother with business and sewed with my sister in her tailor's workshop. We lived together in a small 2 bedroom apartment. We sensed that the arrival of Hitler meant disaster for us, and saw the acute danger clearly and immediately before us. Those possibly could ran away, but we could not get away. The rich were long gone, the less well-off remained. A wave of suicides wiped out the weak, who did not feel up to the threat of danger, and the rest braced themselves with all their moral strength to hold out for whatever else might come. We made some more desperate attempts. My sister had the chance to go to Palestine with an illegal transport. She recoiled from the uncertain fate and hardships. She had to pay for it with her life. My brother, an emigration consultant, specialist in all questions of emigration, helped some people to get out, but he himself got stuck just before the finish line. He had to pay for it with his life. My Erna and I had an American affidavit with a hopeless quota number, and a visa to Shanghai, hopeless from a transportation perspective. But that was not the point. I had a job that held me down with a thousand shackles. Near Brno was a factory that had been converted into a refugee camp. Jews from Vienna, Jews from the Sudetenland, from Burgenland and elsewhere, hunted out of house and home, were rounded up here and concentrated under Gestapo supervision. They were not allowed to leave the camp and lived in inhumane conditions. Badly fed, poorly dressed, robbed to the last, deprived of their freedom of movement, beaten, broken, these people seemed to us the poorest of the poor. The Jews of Brno, who were still free to live in their apartments outside and had begun to recover from the first shock of the Anschluss, began to hear with horror the descriptions of how these poorest of the poor vegetated in the camp. How gladly we would have exchanged places with them later. This was something new, outrageous for us, but also a foreshadowing of what was ahead of us. The doctor on duty in the camp ran away one day, unable to witness the cruelties of the SS. I was called to take his place. Despite all of my family’s warnings and complaints, I accepted the job and soon loved my work out there so much that it held me with greater force than my driving need to emigrate. Despite and against the wishes of the SS men, who visited the camp daily, I managed to set up a hospital and an emergency room, to organize care for children and the elderly, and to ease the lives of those interned as far as possible. The Gestapo, when they saw that I was not intimidated, allowed me to do so, and I was even able to persuade them to help me in my efforts, under the guise of avoiding epidemics. And they were terrified of the spread of infectious diseases, because even the German supermen were not immune to them. At that time there were already actions there, albeit to a lesser extent than later. From time to time the gentlemen of SS, mostly drunk, entertained themselves by making old men run in a circle for hours, or gymnastics, forcing boys to jump from upper floors, and so on. We were horrified. It was the first time we saw something like this with our own eyes. How harmless these entertainments were compared to what came later.

insert_drive_file
Text from page2

At the time, I also had my practice in Brno, had a great deal to do, had the immense luck of having a beloved wife with me, and gradually we got used to the conditions. On June 20, 1941, the day that the Germans invaded Russia, we (Erna and I) had to move to Eibenschütz, where the refugee camp was located, on the order of the Gestapo. At first we were very unhappy about that, because that meant I had to give up the practice and thus a large part of my income. But soon we were satisfied with this change. We got a small, very nice apartment and we set it up to our taste. It was actually our first apartment together. Out there in the small town Hitler’s terror was not as noticable, because there were almost no Germans there. The Czech population helped us when they could, firstly because they liked us, secondly in protest against the Germans. For a while, it almost looked as if the Jewish question would take a back seat after all. If no action was taken for a few weeks, everyone took a breath, believing that the worst terror was over. I earned enough to ensure a carefree life; we were able to provide our people in Brno with all types of food, which was scarce; and we sent parcels to Vienna almost every day. There, Mother Knoll, Bronja and her two children were very dependent on it, because there it was much worse for Jews. There, something had long since begun that would later [rob us] of rest and sleep - transports. It is difficult to describe what the word Transport did to Jews. No sooner had it been spoken than it lay like an alp in the landscape of every family, in every company, people looked at each other in shock, fear and horror marked on their foreheads. For transports meant forced deportation to Poland. You did not know that, but one thing was certain: it was a terrible thing. Thousands of people with packs drove on in cattle cars to face an uncertain but miserable fate. Here and there came letters or postcards from Poland, cries for help. They were starving, freezing, tormented by all the devils. One did not learn more, for no one dared to write the truth. All we knew was that the deported Jews lived and worked crammed in the ghetto. Their luggage was stolen from them, they got almost nothing to eat. My wife could not find peace. Every day she trembled at the news from Vienna, fearing that her mother or the children would have to experience it. But they were spared for the time being. Erna organized an aid operation from Kiganen. She went from house to house, asking, begging, packing, and sending parcels, growing in her new job. Mountains of letters of thanks arrived. Soon we got used to it and the misery of the world became everyday.

We ourselves lived almost as if in peace. Although the staggering Jewish decrees and daily persecution of Jews forced us to realize that Hitler was about to fulfill his Jewish program, that we were condemned to death, but we did not want to feel it, resisted it, we soaked our souls with indestructible optimism: The whole world was against Hitler, so the whole world helped us and each day had to bring us closer to the good end, which could not be long in coming. But soon it started again, and blow over blow it overcame us. In Brno there were smaller scale actions. Streets were destroyed, all the men who were found, arrested and dragged away. A total of 224 men. Within six days, 222 stereotypical telegraphic death reports came, they had died in Mauthausen, causes of death: angina, heart attack, pneumonia. The remaining two disappeared without a death report. Similar actions were repeated. Then a few weeks to recover, and that was enough to revive the unfounded, or at least premature, optimism.

insert_drive_file
Text from page3

All Jews and people of Jewish descent were registered and separated once and for all from the rest of the world. An incalculable downpour of ordinances separated them from the other world. A flood of prohibitions and laws rained down. First, we had to wear a yellow star that marked everyone who was legally recognized as a Jew from afar. We were outlawed. No Aryan was allowed to speak with us. Half-grown rascals attacked the marked women and old people and beat them bloody, and in packs they attacked men and abused them too. One night I came from an ill person and was attacked. I came away with a broken nose and a few wounds from blows. My family could not recognize me when I was brought home. But all these were episodes and events that we accepted and suffered in the prospect of the imminent end, which could not be long in coming. The Jews acquired a facial expression that made them recognizable, even if they had not worn the star. Fear, terror, restlessness in the eyes, slinking along the walls, always ready to be hit, slain, beaten to death. Only within their own four walls, among themselves, could they relax their nerves, open up, speak with eyes shining of the day of liberation, which had to come and would come soon. In spirit, our tormentors were caught, hanged, punished, and the better world we dreamed of arose in our mind's eye. After 8pm no Jew was allowed on the street, and they could enter no restaurant, no cinema or theater. In the tram they were only allowed to ride on the front platform of the sidecar. Those who lived in houses remained within, because they dared not go into the alley. And again restriction on top of restriction. Jews were not allowed to buy tobacco, fruit or vegetables, they could only pick up their laughable food rations at certain times. Radios, furs, cameras, luxury goods, binoculars, jewelry, gold, silver, valuables had to be surrendered. Any evasion of these ordinances meant certain death.

But everything could be endured. However, the great variable in life lay like an alp: transports. In Vienna, they had become an everyday event. Thousands of people went to Poland twice a week from there. Our protectorate had been spared until now. In the autumn of 1941, it started to hit us. First, 4 transports had to leave Prague, each with 1000 people, to Lodz. The selection was completely arbitrary, rich, poor, healthy, old, children, ill. After each transport, handled with German thoroughness and cruelty, we hoped that it was the last one. But they kept on going; the longer the breaks between the transports lasted, the quicker the optimism returned. It was completely unfounded. Because with relentless regularity transport followed transport. On November 19, 1941, the first thousand people were taken from Brno. My brother had to go. Was it useful to him that he became a transport leader? He had to go with his wife. The telephone conversation in which we said goodbye to each other was unforgettable, as if it were forever. I could not even take the 30 km train to Brno to see him once, because it was forbidden for Jews. We both knew that we would not meet again. At that time, for the first time, I swore I would never feel pity for a German when the time came. He left.

insert_drive_file
Text from page4

They ended up in Minsk, Russia. Just last week, in Vienna, I was able to sketch the details of his fate there when I was handed over his letters. The 80,000 Jews residing in Minsk, Polish and Russian, were exterminated in mass executions. Under indescribable terror they had to dig their own mass graves, had to undress in the winter cold and stand on the edge of the graves. Then they were shot down with machine guns, and fell backward into the grave. The bodies were covered with lime and buried by the next victims, whether they were dead or alive. Aryan eyewitnesses report that they saw the earth move for days afterwards. Then the next shuffle came, until everyone was murdered. Under the terror of submachine guns people dug their own graves, they did not grumble, they did not shirk. Some prayed, but all walked up, dug, undressed, were shot down, fell into the graves, and died. People, with senses and intellect.- In place of these unfortunates, Jews were imported from all over Europe: From Hamburg, Berlin, Brno, Prague. They populated the ghetto of the murdered, only to be exterminated themselves soon afterwards. They worked hard and suffered unspeakably from starvation and cold like all of their fellow-travelers. Most dropped dead, many were killed, some managed to stay above water. Including my brother. He was clever enough, not only to get a good job, but he also managed to send signs of life under the greatest mortal danger. There were a total of 8 letters from him that could be published as they are. Already in the second he shared the death of his wife, whom he loved above all else. She had to undergo a stomach operation, which was performed on a kitchen table with improvised instruments. A good friend of mine performed it. Eight days later she died of complications. He only hinted at what they had experienced before that. Each action chased the last and, as everywhere in camps and ghettos, had the purpose of clearing the ranks of the poorest of the poor and taking away the old, ill, and children, that is, the ballast, but to reach the quota ordered young and healthy people were taken too, to make room for the newly-arrived, like cattle to slaughter. The other letters are from a broken man. Under infinite danger and difficulty, his Viennese friends sent him food that kept him alive. It took a lot of cleverness to avoid the racing actions. He succeeded until October 1943. Emaciated to the skeleton, he had lost over 30 kg, deeply depressed about the loss of his wife, resigned to his fate, he wrote his last, shocking letter in which he hinted at his imminent fate. The person who passed on his letter, who must have been very fond of him, added words in a trembling script that leave no doubt that he, too, was murdered, like hundreds of thousands of others. The only hope that remains is that he did not have to suffer, beyond what he went through before.

But back to us. Transport after transport was completed, from Brno, from Prague, from the provinces. It transpired that the transports no longer went to Poland but to Theresienstadt, a town on Czech soil, where a ghetto was being built. More and more friends had to leave, and our ranks cleared. The transports were always labeled with letters, the first with A, then B, C and so on. My brother had left with Transport F and from the day of his deportation until his death he had no name, but he was the number F 998 1Note 1 : F 994. When they were finished with the alphabet, double letters came up: Aa, Ab, Ac, etc. Weeks, months passed by. We felt fairly safe, because we had been assured by the Germans as well as from the Jewish side that we were indispensable and would not be deported. I was a licensed Jewish doctor / only a small fraction of Jewish physicians were allowed to practice. / And,

insert_drive_file
Text from page5

next to the camp, a group of Jewish miners was in charge of armaments. At that time, families were not torn apart. If someone was deported, then it was with the whole family, or the family stayed home.

As awful as the transports were, at Eibenschütz we only saw them from afar. We continued living our quiet, almost idyllic life there. Away from the horrors of terror, retreating to our beloved apartment, surrounded by good friends, supported and sustained by the open sympathy of the locals, fully engaged in satisfying work, we lived in the hope that we would survive this terrible time in this way and that it could not take much longer. In February 1942, the big turning point in the war came: Stalingrad. Every day we got our reports, studied newspapers, listened to banned overseas broadcasts and longingly counted the days: how long it could take? We were aware of the evil times and yet no one could guess what awaited us. We saw before us the misery of camp life in Eibenschütz, but we also saw that it was possible to make things easier for the children and the ill in the camp, and even gives them better lives than they could have outside, since Jewish children outside the camp were inhibited by wearing the Jewish star and forced to navigate a maze of prohibitions. After careful consideration, we came to the decision to have a child at this stage in life. We trusted in the inexorably approaching end of the war. We trusted in ourselves. Erna’s pregnancy made her blossom like never before. She had never looked so good, she was never as strong, as beautiful as in this time. With her usual conscientiousness, she prepared everything. Nor do I have to say that, like everything else that she took up, she also managed the business with exemplary perfection. The times were difficult, she had no help, she had to help out with the practice and take care of the entire household. She turned out to be an excellent cook, Peppi would have enjoyed it if she had seen her in her new element. It is difficult to describe how happily we were in those months, in spite of it all. Outside, the flood raged, murder, fire, misery, terror, but it seemed to stop at the doors of our home, which, like an island of peace and happiness, provided a sanctuary not only for us but for our friends as well. The pregnancy was nearing its end when it broke upon us. First, on 27. 3. 1942 my mother became the number Af 261 and had to enter the schleuse. No sooner had I said goodbye to her than we too were called up. From all sides we were assured that it was a mistake, we should not pack, because we were indispensable. The German director of the coal mine telephoned and telegraphed and informed me that I should to stay away from the transport and he would take responsibility. I didn't do it, and shortly thereafter all the Jewish miners were lined up as well. Erna was due in the next few days, she already had a big belly. She packed for three, because we needed to bring everything for the child. She ironed, washed, organized, hid, sewed jewelry and gold into seams, was everywhere and did everything. She did not sleep for three days and three nights, then we were in the schleuse. My sister lined up next to us with her spouse in the school, which had been cleared for this purpose. As we walked through the gate of the school, the free world closed behind us. We could not know that barely one percent of those who had passed through this gate would survive the war.

The fall from the peaceful life of our home and our position into the deportation was a tremendous one. I did not feel it, because I was not spoiled and was trained in sports. But for a woman in her condition, it was terrible. Hundreds lay in on the ground in darkened classrooms. Cold, SS Terror, with shooting and beatings to intimidate us. We were dispatched in endless procedures, which still reminded us of normal life.

insert_drive_file
Text from page6

Food cards, money, all documents, apartment keys, valuables. After three days, at night, so that the general population did not see what was happening to us, we were lined up in rows and chased to the station. SS guards had their fun beating old people to make them run, mocking and ridiculing them. We got into our train cars, the Jewish aid organization had done exemplary work, all luggage was stored in our Kupes ordered by numbers and the 12 hour ride to Theresienstadt was not too bad. Ah 711, which was once my wife, sat beside Ah 712 and was happy, for it was rumoured that men and women were separated. Ah 713 and Ah 714, sister and brother-in-law, rode with us. The first shock was overcome and once again we regained our elixir of life; optimism, the joyful expectancy of the coming liberation.

When we arrived in Terezin, we heard that my mother had arrived well 3 days ago. At the station men and women were really separated. The head doctor of Theresienstadt recognized me and had Erna, considering her condition, transferred to the women’s barracks immediately, which meant that she was spared the three-day stay in the schleuse. Before being admitted to the ghetto, the new arrivals had to be channeled through the schleuse, a kind of quarantine, but it was mainly used to search and confiscate luggage. Medication, tools, instruments, tobacco products, canned goods, food, batteries, candles, lighters and much more were channeled. This expression was known to every ghetto inmate as a common word and was used to describe every kind of scam; one of the most important concepts in Theresienstadt. In this schleuse, hundreds of us lay on the ground, with a bit of straw beneath us. An old friend from Brno was on duty with the ghetto guard and helped smuggle me into the women’s barracks where Erna was staying on the first day. How happy I was to see her again. My mother had just taken her in, prepared her a kind of bed and made her halfway comfortable. So it was not so bad even if the men slept, lived and were fed like pigs, women had it better and above all, they stayed within our reach. We also see that our assumptions about the children were correct, and that the ghetto's management took care of their schooling much as I did in the refugee camp before, and the war would not last long. We took courage and looked forward to the things that were to come.

On 4. 4. 1942 we arrived in Theresienstadt, and on 9. 4. our son was born. In the morning, Dr. H., the gynecologist who looked after Erna, told me that the contractions had begun and that the birth was to be expected in the evening. I fought for a pass slip to enter the women’s barracks for 5 h. The gendarme who examined the slip at the gate asked, Ah, you're the one who got the boy? So I learned that it was all over and that we had a boy. He was born at 1pm. I stormed into the delivery room, and found a very pale but overjoyed Erna lying in bed. She was bleeding so much that I did not want to see the child at first. The birth was easy, but there was a complication after birth, and she had to undergo surgery and nearly bled out. But now everything was fine. Fine? He had been born in a barrack room, on a borrowed iron bed, and three hours later she had to go back to her Ubication, as the living quarters were called there, together with 12 2Note 2 : number is unclear other women, some of whom were shortly before birth and others who were shortly before it. She could not get used to the environment, but she kept herself brave. Words cannot describe what kind of woman she was and what she managed.

insert_drive_file
Text from page7

She carried out motherhood in an exemplary fashion, as she did everything she put her hand to. She had to lie in bed for three weeks until she was well enough to be able to get up. She insisted on nursing the child, she looked after it like no other child was cared for. She was the model mother, the child the model child. We called him Michael Josef after Erna’s brother, who had been murdered by the Nazis. He was the most beautiful child born in Theresienstadt / 296 3Note 3 : number is unclear children were born there all together/. My sister and mother helped Erna, but it was very hard. Constantly new and newer obstacles had to be overcome before mother and child were taken care of. The water had to be towed up 2 floors, then coal, wood, an oven, a berth, cot and changing table, and a hundred other things that had to be procured first. Whether it was smuggled or newly-made, it was paid for with food that was already so limited. We got to eat: 330 g bread, black coffee, 2 watery soups, 300 g potatoes with some sauce or vegetables. Workers got a little more bread and some margarine. But we still had some supplies from home, and I started working as a doctor and was soon able to earn so much that I could do it. But it was all only because Erna toiled tirelessly, she resisted the food and it was no wonder that she became quite run-down, as she did not want to hear a word about rest and recovery.

Unfortunately, it soon became apparent that Theresienstadt was not our final stop. As transports arrived - and there were 2-3 per week- equally strong ones were sent away again, to the east. Back 4Note 4 : illegible could only be seriously ill and people 5Note 5 : illegible has friends. Even families with small children were protected.

So we had nothing to fear and also because I worked as a doctor, we were not sent on a transport. But on April 28, 1942 my sister and her husband were to be transported to the East. It would have been possible to get her out, but she did not want to. She suffered so much from the separation from her husband; they were not allowed to see each other, since men and women lived and worked in strict separation, so she wanted to leave, hoping they would be together at their new destination. My sister wrote 3 cards from the Lublin area. She had not seen her husband since the ride. Then both were lost.

But life went on. We found solace in our child, which worried us a lot and yet thrived. Jews from all over Europe wallowed in Theresienstadt, were processed, sifted and sent on. Young people were not sent via Theresienstadt, but were sent directly from Vienna, Hamburg, Berlin, Munich and other cities to Poland to their ruin. Only people over 65 years came to Theresienstadt to die here, or to fall victim to a transport to the east. In the hot summer months, a Ruhr epidemic broke out, hundreds died daily in the fully stuffed barracks, and the bodies could not be taken away in time because there were too many. A crematorium was built because the gravediggers could not keep up. The epidemic also spread to the infants' home and nearly half of all children died. Erna contracted measles in July. This disease is serious and very dangerous for adults. She was in great danger and infected the child with it. For 48 hours it looked like both were lost. First, the mother recovered, but then the child got the feared diarrhea. Three anxious days and just as many endless nights we fought for his life. And he got well. What did we want more? We got our child back twice. Everything else was 6Note 6 : end of the line is missing

...another happy surprise came. On the 6th of July a transport arrived bearing the quiet, modest and very skinny Mother Knoll. Can you imagine how happy mother and daughter were in all this 7Note 7 : end of the line is missing

when they found each other. Of Bronja and her children, 8Note 8 : end of the line is missing reported they were sent directly to Poland. At that time we knew that Poland meant certain death, and always hoped for 9Note 9 : end of the line is missing.

insert_drive_file
Text from page8

And on a final happy reunion.

Meanwhile, conditions in Theresienstadt improved to some extent. At the beginning, only a few old barracks were accessible to the Jews and habitable, the whole city was later settled by Jews after the Aryan population had been forcibly evacuated. With this, the ban on leaving the house also fell.

And we were able to move freely in the city, so we could visit our families and do that when we wanted. The children were allowed in the gardens and although the food was so short that you could starve to death, there were ways and means to improve it. Old, single people were lost, sooner or later they died of hunger and exhaustion. But where there was a young person in the family, they could create and improve all sorts of things, be it better sleeping places, clothes or even more food. I had a wife and child, mother and mother-in-law, and two aunts to provide for. It was hard, but it worked out. The child soon became the center of the whole family, our hope, our pride. Mother, grandmother, aunts but also patients vied to give him everything he needed. So it went on halfway and it seemed once again that the worst was over. Then Erna began to ache. The heavy blood loss at birth, later the hard physical work without proper nutrition, and later the severe barrack fever, she went downhill rapidly. It had been a long time since she had had the thriving appearance of pregnancy. She began to cough and one day it was clear: she had something on her lung. That was nearly the worst thing that could happen in Theresienstadt. Not only that it lacked all the preconditions for healing, namely good air, plenty of food and rest, but above all, she immediately had to be separated from the child so as not to endanger it. Do you know what it means to be separated from the child as a young mother in such circumstances? I thought she could not stand it emotionally. It took weeks of convincing her that she needed to get well until she had the will to get well. It would be a long story to tell how a lounge chair was acquired, how the fight for food began, how we all hungered for many a day to exchange what was necessary for her and her child. It took a lot of effort to get them to eat as they did not want to take anything we had saved ourselves. We had to lie the blue out of the sky, assuring her how much we had to eat, and that nobody would come up short due to the rations we had saved for them. She got eggs, butter, fruit, things that were otherwise known only through hearsay. She began to recover. Fortunately, our condition continued to improve as postal mail was allowed, and even parcels could be sent. Our Czech friends risked great danger (because it was dangerous to help Jews) to send us nice food parcels. Month after month passed, critical, anxious weeks. But Erna was soon out of danger and the miracle happened: she got well again. Again she got color in her face, again she became rounded and cheerful. Her lung problem disappeared almost completely and with her recovery we spoke again of our beautiful future, that soon finally the miserable war would be over, how long could it last? The child did surprisingly well. The sisters to whom he had been entrusted loved him and cared for him above themselves.

I know, parents are not objective about their children, but our Mischa was a particularly well-done example of a human. He was a very beautiful child. Small and squat in stature, he resembled his mother otherwise; he had her olive skin color and her big, bright eyes, a tiny barely visible nose and pearl-white teeth. He soon started to walk and talk, of course only in Czech. His mother diligently learned this difficult language with him because she knew she would need it in the future. Mother and child were such a pleasing sight and a well-known phenomenon in Theresienstadt.

insert_drive_file
Text from page9

Unforgettable was my 34th birthday, when both dressed in white, each with a bunch of flowers in hand, they picked me up from work and congratulated me; how outraged my son was when I did not immediately give the flowers he had presented to me back to him. Mischa was the declared darling of all, with everything a child needs. He was dressed like a prince and had a new suit almost every day; I do not think he would have been better nourished or equipped had we been free. He was a very good child and often reminded us of Norberti when he was little. He hardly ever cried, even if he was ill. He liked to share his toys with others, which is rare with children. He loved his grandmothers above all else. He was happy when he could make those around him laugh and displayed considerable acting talent. We worried about him, but everything was made up for by the untold happiness that he brought to those around him.

Months passed, and each day the much-anticipated liberation came one step closer. The ghetto was improved and embellished. It became a figurehead, a model ghetto. They were expecting an International Commission and they wanted to show how well the Jews were doing. Parks were created, children’s homes with playgrounds and paddling pools, shower baths, open-air concerts with parades, theater, concerts, and a coffee house were built from the ground up. Although the purpose was clear, we became beneficiaries. In Terezin, the best artists in Europe were interned, so the performances were at a very high level. We heard concerts that cannot soon be forgotten. Two football fields on which championships were fought emerged. Sport events were also celebrated, e.g. at Lag Baomer. The commission came, viewed everything with indulgent smiles, and let themselves be fooled. As soon as they were gone, the magic collapsed. Again it was announced: transports. Whenever we forgot for a few days that we were interned in a concentration camp, the word transport was spoken, and with one blow everything changed. Terrified, people slunk through the streets, whispering groups stood together, hunched, waiting for the list to be announced, the same picture again and again: fear, terror, Are you in there? No, I'm not in it, I'm protected, but my mother is in! Have you already appealed? Yes, but it is hopeless. The same topic of conversation, the same haste, the same agitation everywhere. Rushing to pack, as soon as the list is posted you can see again the oh so familiar picture. Heavily packed figures, numbered tablets around their necks, wander towards the schleuse, a barracks that had to house the unfortunate victims who had lost their lives in the unknown and had to drive away towards certain death. As soon as everyone was gathered there, the gates closed, and they no longer belonged to us: they were the foreign body that was to be expelled, but first had to be put to the side, demarcated, separated. Then they are loaded in wagons, the wagons are sealed and the transport is gone. And now the miracle happens. Everything breathes relief, what's gone is gone. Probably a girl is crying here, who had to let her parents go, there a little mother, whose son was taken away. But life in Theresienstadt continues, this time it is still good. When, for God's sake, is the next transport? Oh well, until let the Soff 10Note 10 : end be, every day is life won. But after three months there were always 1-2 more transports and always the same, cruel game. 200,000 people came to Theresienstadt, 30,000 now lived there, all the others left with transports. Eight times my mother was put on the list, eight times I was able to get her out thanks to my position and my connections. On 13. 12. 1943 she and Mother Knoll were put on a transport. This time all my efforts were in vain. Did misery never end? I gave her injections to create an artificial fever and make her unable to transport. To no end. She had to go. She behaved heroically; she would have left happy and courageous, but saying farewell to the child was very difficult. On the last night, which I spent with her at the schleuse,

insert_drive_file
Text from page10

she confessed that the months she had spent with us and her darling Misha, despite all the misery of deportation, were some of the happiest of her life. We did not know what awaited them, but we hoped that they would last the short time until our liberation, in hopes of a reunion. We did not see them again. The transport went to Birkenau Auschwitz. We smuggled secret letters out and asked for food parcels for both mothers. Over 30 packages were sent, but they did not receive one. They died of hunger shortly after their arrival.

How we missed our mothers! Our life normalized a bit. We were actually doing better and better. What had thus far gone towards our mothers now benefited the child and Erna. We got valuable packages and most of all, we got secret and dangerous newspapers and reports from outside. And we knew it was coming to an end. The front approached from the east, the invasion succeeded. We expected the collapse daily. I had converted a horse stable into a small single room, which we had for ourselves. What happy hours the three of us spent there. The future shone bright before us in beautiful colors, we loved to talk about our loved ones all over the world, how we would see them again and how proud we would be to show them our pride. Everything seemed to be correct. Of course it hurt that sisters, brothers and now also our mothers were separated from us; that they no longer lived, we did not think about that. Only the end came so slowly, so slowly, too slowly. When we no longer thought about this possibility, the disaster came. In the fall of 1944 came the order: 5,000 young men must go to work in the Reich, so again there would be transports. Overall, there were only about 5,400 men, so practically everyone had to leave. But soon it turned out that this time it was something that Theresienstadt had not seen yet. At intervals of 3 days, transport after transport, at first only men, then their wives and children, later, indiscriminately, everyone under 65 years. I got on the so-called blue protection list, a list of people who were indispensable and had to stay in Theresienstadt. Again we let ourselves think, as in Eibenschütz, that we were safe. And after each transport that was dispatched, everyone hoped: that was the last. But there was no end, it was like an evacuation. No one knew where the transports went, what happened to those on them. We were so blinded, we really were not capable of any logical thought. That it was a bad thing, we knew, they talked about new ghettos, women’s and children’s camp near the place where the men were supposed to work. A guessing game, no one knew what it was all about. Only those highest up knew what was happening, and they were silent as a grave. Theresienstadt was not recognizable. The crowded living rooms were emptying, everyone was packing, a mess of discarded and left behind things. -

On October 19, 1944 fate befell us, and the three of us were placed in the ninth transport of this series. Eleven were dispatched altogether. It was a hard blow, but we kept our heads up. The child was big enough for a journey, Erna was healthy and strong again and me, I did not have to talk about it. And how long could all this fun last? No, we did not let it get us down. As prudent and efficient as ever, Erna packed our things together. Misha was full of unbridled joy, as he was delighted to finally be able to ride the train.

On April 1, 1942, our freedom came to an end. On 19. 10. 1944 our life. - The conditions under which we were transported were indescribable. 92 people penned in a wagon together with all their luggage, without toilet facilities, almost without water, as we drove 2 days and 3 nights. At dawn on the 22nd, we drove slowly to the ramp

insert_drive_file
Text from page11

of Auschwitz. Auschwitz, that sounded bad, that was known as one of the worst concentration camps. But how could we know what Auschwitz really was? Words can never describe it, no, even the sickest imagination cannot conjure what happened there. To make a long story short: in the car, Polish Jewish in striped suits crept in at the doors and windows, shouting at us to get out and leave all our luggage behind. They made people take their wristwatches from their hands and beat them when they defended themselves. They began to rob and steal whatever they liked. We were stunned, stunned. Erna tried to speak Yiddish with them, they did not pay her any heed. Get out, they said, men here, women and children there. I said a quick goodbye to my wife and child and promised them to come to them in the course of the day, I managed to overcome all obstacles to get to Erna in Theresienstadt two years ago, why shouldn’t I be able to do the same here? Misha was in a very good mood, because he liked new things. Slowly, the columns moved forward. There were three senior SS officers, immobile waxy skulls, and later I learned that one of them was the infamous Dr. Mengele, lord of life and death for millions of people. For the first time, I saw the cruel game that I did not understand at the time and would later see so often. As each stepped forward, he pointed either to the right or to the left. He directed the young, strong people to the right; the old, women with children, and the ill to the left. He sent me right. When I saw that women with children on the left, I slipped to the left behind his back. An SS guard saw this and chased me back to Mengele. Herr Obersturmfuhrer, I am a doctor, I would like to go with the children and the ill. A scrutinizing look measures me from head to toe, then sends me to the right again. Once again I saw my wife, her exuberantly hopping son holding her hand, in the column of women with children, then they vanished from my sight. If only he had let me go with them! I would have been led with a thousand others, like millions before and after in the shower bath. There, inscriptions in all the languages ​​of Europe stated that one should remember the number where their clothes were hung, so that they would not be confused. Undressed, everyone got a piece of soap and a paper towel in their hands and were then admitted into the bathroom. A huge room with showers hanging from the ceiling. Only it was noticeable that 1500 people were being stuffed in, tightly packed. The showers were not showers, they just looked like them, decoys. Behind the last bather the doors closed hermetically and a German hero was provided with a gas mask, throwing cyanide bombs through a shaft into the room. He watched the success through a little window. If he had used enough gas, it took 13 minutes until the last scream fell silent, but sometimes they skimped, then it took half an hour or more. How were the cries? I hope they did not know where they were going. I saw her constantly in front of me, my wife, naked, the child on her arm, calm, superior, angelic, in the sanctity of her motherhood, in the jostling crowd of naked bodies. I see her in front of me, at the moment of the offense, as she tries to protect the child, tries to protect herself, I see her then united in death, the mother of my son and my son, and I am deeply sad that I was not allowed to lie there with them, and that I am not with them now.

What happened to them next was terrible. On massive [cranes], the corpses were taken to the crematorium, and each was examined by one of the 50 dentists who worked there day and night ripping out gold teeth. Then into the oven with it. First the children, they burn best, then women, men last. It could be even worse. There were a to-

insert_drive_file
Text from page12

tal of six crematoria in operation. Not all were so humanely equipped. If there was too much of a rush, or there was no gas, they did not [wait long]. There were several ways to kill people, from the ax to an execution-style shot with a small pistol, to save on the usual shooting. Little children were thrown into the fire alive. The roar of the victims of Crematorium VI was audible throughout the camp for hours. This Crematorium VI was very primitive and only used in emergencies, not out of sentimentality, but to save trouble. The victims were not allowed to know what was happening to them because otherwise they might defend themselves in their final despair. Crematorium VI looked like a farmhouse, nestled in a grove, surrounded by an opaque wooden fence. Near the house was a big pit, with straw in it, which was showered with gasoline. The slain ones were burned under the open sky here. Only after revolts and other unpleasant incidents had the machine been rationalized and brought to a more humane level. All of this is true, not the offspring of morbid fantasies.

But I did not know all that then, I learned it only weeks after liberation. On the gray morning of our arrival in Auschwitz we went to the right. 1500 people, we had been loaded in Theresienstadt; 160 men and 40/60 11Note 11 : The number is illegible. women went to the right. We too came to a bath after an hour's march. But even the way there taught us that we were in another world. Right and left stood a double 4m high barbed wire fence with large inscriptions reading: Attention: high voltage, do not touch. Flanked by SS guards with machine pistols at the ready. To the left and right behind the fences, infinitely long and infinitely barren rows of barracks. Their inmates were not allowed to leave the barracks while we were marching through, nobody was allowed to talk to us. From a block of women, a young woman shouted over to us to throw some food over the fence. A preserve, a loaf of bread flew over. There's a shot and the woman lies dead in her blood. Onward. Seems to be an everyday affair, because nobody behind the fence gets upset about it. I'm trying to start up a conversation with the guard whistling beside me. He is not unfriendly and answers my question about how it is for children here: With the children, yes, that was bad so far. But now it is better, they have their own group homes, the mothers live with them and go to work during the day. They have their own food and are cared for by older women when the mothers are working. This information calmed me to some extent and helped ease what came later. I do not want to linger on it long because what happened to me is not important. I kept going because I wanted to see my child again. Whatever happened from that moment until our liberation, I always had the child in mind and knew I had to stay alive. It is completely inexplicable to me today that I remained alive. In the Auschwitz bath, called the Sauna, we were robbed under bouts and beatings, bellowing and ranting, of the last things we still had. First we had to deliver money and gold, as far as we still had any: wedding rings, watches, fountain pens. I crushed my watch and buried my fountain pen. We were subjected to a renewed selection, as the beautiful game was called, each new sorting out, which we had first experienced at the station with Dr. Mengele and where was decided who should die immediately and who should be sent to the labor camp to die there after long torment. We were allowed to keep our glasses, belts and loafers, we had to hand over everything else. They searched all our body cavities for hidden valuables. Then we were shaved all over our bodies, sent under a cold shower, and chased out into the open in icy cold weather. Teeth chattering, we waited naked, until we got our new [clothes]. Filthy stinking striped prisoners suits, so-called pajamas, often stained with blood, presumably stripped from someone who had been beaten to death. Then the

insert_drive_file
Text from page13

new numbers were tattooed in the forearm, signed for life. So far I had been called Ah 712, from now on simply 119224. No underclothes, no coat, no stockings. Very cold, we stared at each other and did not recognize each other. Not just that we were shorn and disguised, as at a masquerade ball, but a new look was there. Naked horror, coupled with fear, but also a determination to pay them back what they were doing with us. So that was the work in the Reich we were sent to? Many fell during the procedures and did not stand up, not even when the flailing dog whip painted bloody welts on their skin. Even in front of the bath building, we drilled the main command: hats off, hats on. Shouts, beatings, shots. Where is Mischa now? Does Erna have enough blankets? Did they already get something to eat? These worries constantly went through my head because they were now alone and without my help. For the first time, actually. Finally, it is already evening, we march into our barracks. I ask our Stubendienst, an older prisoner, what he knows about the children. What, your child? Look there, there you have your child! He points to a huge chimney, visible from everywhere in the camp. The grisly symbol of annihilation. Giant, black, towering into the evening sky, meters high flames rise from it, although it is already a good 20 m high. Do you see how well your child is burning? You do not need to worry about your wife and child anymore. Mine went there half a year ago and as you can see, I am still alive. What does this man talk about? Has he gone mad? Or am I crazy? That's not possible, that's ... I walk down the camp street in a daze, meet a loyal companion from Theresienstadt, who has already been here for 3 12Note 12 : The number is illegible. weeks. Completely disturbed, I tell him what I've just heard. He laughs at me, and says that it’s not true, or at least exaggerated. People do get gassed and burned, but only old people, cripples, disabled people. Children and women? What a thought! He himself had worked on an external commando near the FKL (women’s and children’scamp), he himself had seen how children played under the supervision of older women there, their rooms clean, painted white. I should not let people scare me. People like to do that here. He had trouble calming and convincing me. But, what man wants to believe, he chooses to believe. Still, I felt the barb. The comrade brought in more eyewitnesses, who had to confirm to me that the children had looked well, that the women had been allowed to keep their clothes, they had not even been shaved bald. That was all similar to what the SS guard had told me, and I had renewed hope. And besides, even they were human beings, and it is quite impossible that people, even if they are SS, would murder innocent children. I did not miss any opportunity later to catch up on any information about what happened to women and children in Auschwitz. Was it the wisdom of the informants or were they startled by my questioning eyes? I do not know, I collected statement after statement and became more and more convinced that they were still alive. How and where, the gods only knew.

I stayed in Auschwitz for four days. Hell cannot be worse. We got nothing to eat because our provisions were bartered away by our block elders for liquor and women. A shy protest attempt by an inmate ended with him being beaten half to death. He died shortly thereafter. Daily selections, sometimes twice a day. Sleeping on a cot, without a blanket. Hours of roll call, drilling, shots, whipping, roaring. Suicides plunging into the high voltage wires, hanging there, burned, for hours, days at a time. At night, the howling of the block eldest. And everywhere towering high into the sky: the unnerving image of the flaming, smoking chimney, the smell of burning singed flesh. How could I stand this? Again and again the nagging question, did they really only burn cripples and

insert_drive_file
Text from page14

old people? When had it been my mother’s turn, my aunt’s? It was like a dream - on the fifth day we were recruited into a work transport. Of the 160 selected at the station, barely half were left. Again, 1500 men, picked out of many transport, we hunted into prepared cars under vigilant watch, everything at a running pace, pushed, hunted, shots. Each of us grabs a loaf of bread, a slice of sausage, a piece of margarine. After four days of fasting, we jump on it like wolves. Trapped in cattle cars, we devour our [rations], soon to hear that it was intended to be food for three days. Three days trapped in the dark cattle wagon without a toilet, no water. Many pass out, in the dark one walks around the other. Standing, you sleep a few minutes, or was it hours? Through cracks and joints we try to recognize the direction of travel. Moravia, Olomouc, Brno. If only we stopped here somewhere. We could run away easily. Here we are at home. Continue. Vienna, Neulengbach, St. Pölten. Are we going to the dreaded Mauthausen near Linz? Linz. Long stop. No, onward, Salzburg, then we are in Bavaria. How long have we been riding? Three days or is it five? How many nights, how many days? Suddenly the seals are broken off, the doors are torn open. Out! Fast fast! Let's go, five, front man, side-facing! How many times should we still hear this command! Half stunned, trembling with cold, we stumble onto the platform, stretch, shake our numb limbs. It is night. The station clock shows ½ 1 h. I decipher the name Kaufering station. We march, fifteen groups of one hundred men for half an hour into a camp, again a double barbed wire fence, small wooden huts, partly underground like a bunker: we learn that it is part of a warehouse in Dachau. We get bread, hot coffee. Here you get something to eat! Misha, I will see you again. Where are you? Is your mother with you? - Our transport, made up of strong men, begins its everyday life in the labor camp. 14 to 16 hours of the hardest work daily, I work moving earth and concrete. Almost nothing to eat. First 300 g 13Note 13 : The number is illegible., later less and less bread and 1 litre of water soup was the food for the day. Bitter cold, miserable clothes, beatings, hours of roll call before and after work, punishment, food deprivation, shootings, selections. Anyone who is ill or unable to continue is sent to Dachau to the gas chamber. Being ill for one day could cost a lifetime. We work through fever, diarrhea, pustulent hands and feet, open frostbite, bleeding wounds from the blows and rifle butts of our guards. Every day our ranks are diminished, new arrivals from Hungary, Lithuania, Poland, fill in the gaps. Same thing day after day. Getting up in the nighttime darkness, roll call in the freezing cold, for hours, endless. An hour's walk to work through dung, snow, water, ice, with perforated clogs, without stockings, many barefoot. Let's go to five, front man, side direction! Then heavy nonstop work, driven with whips, ranting. The hunger becomes unbearable, the fingers freeze on the icy shovels. In the evening, dead tired, go home to the camp. Again roll call, then down the water soup. People fell like flies. They died on the march, while eating, in their sleep, at the roll call. They died at work, under the blows of the overseers. They died of hunger, dysentery, edema, heart failure. No day off, now we know what hunger looks like. The lice eat us up, the humans turn into animals, they steal each other's bread, they beat each other bloody over some rotten potato peels. We eat rotten cabbage, dug out of manure, as it is, unwashed. Moldy bread crusts, thrown away by our guards. Living snails, if we found them, grass. Hunger drives us crazy. Teeth clenched, you have to hold on. The small group of friends from Theresienstadt

insert_drive_file
Text from page15

becomes smaller and smaller and melts away. New people come, they come and die, come and die. How easy is it to give up. All you have to do is drop into the wet mud, into which we sink deeply at work. Then you were either beaten to death or shot for refusing to work, or you just got pneumonia. Many gave up. That was out of the question for me. I saw the sweet head of my boy constantly in front of me, I heard him call: Tatínku pojď 14Note 14 : Come, father, his mother held him by the hand and said calmly: You will endure it. I endured it. How? It is a mystery to me. Winter passed, in April the front began to approach. The cannons became audible. On the 24th of April everything seemed to dissolve, we expected our liberators, we did not go to work anymore. Then they said: the whole camp will march away. In endless gray ghostly colonies it begins to move. After more than 3 years we saw villages, cities, normal free people again for the first time. We must have been a terrible sight. Why did all those who saw us cry? We did not understand it. Today we know that the sight of us made them cry. They threw us bread, the guards shot at them, we marched day and night, without food, flanked by SS with wild bloodhounds. If there is anything worse than the horror of the labour camp, we experienced it on this Dachau death march. People sank down, unable to continue, and they were shot. If one collapsed in a city, he got an injection, as if receiving medical help, but in fact, he was killed in that inconspicuous way. 15,000 people started the march. On 2. 5. the Americans liberated us. 4,500 more dead than alive did not even have the strength to be happy about it. Sunken eyes gazed dully out of their sockets at this unbelievable luck. Well, we experienced it. Misha, where are you, where will I find you? - Of the 1,500 of us who came from Auschwitz to Kaufering, there were still 6. I weighed 42 kg 15Note 15 : The number is illegible.. Continue.

I became an English interpreter, got a car and began to search. It was not long before I knew the whole truth. In Frankfurt I learned that there were 500 16Note 16 : The number is illegible. Jewish children in Paris, orphans from concentration camps, one last glimmer of hope, regardless of all obstacles, I made my way to Paris. There I learned the whole truth. No Jewish child, no Jewish mother left Auschwitz alive. Over. Why did I endure everything? What am I still living for? It is a mistake, I do not belong here, I belong to the left, to the child, to the woman.

I had to go to hospital, where I spent 6 weeks because of a feverish heart condition, then I drove home to Prague. Home?

insert_drive_file
Text from page1

Ich habe es gesehen

Ihr wollt es wissen, Ihr sollt es erfahren. Ich habe es gesehen, gehört, erlebt, ich will es Euch aufschreiben, ohne etwas hinzuzufügen, ohne etwas zu verschweigen.

Als unsere Heimat von Hitler besetzt wurde und in ein deutsches Protektorat umgewandelt wurde, lebten wir in Brünn. Ich war Arzt in einem brünner Sanatorium, meine Frau half meiner Mutter in der Wirtschaft und meiner Schwester in ihrer Schneiderwerkstätte nähen. Wir bewohnten zusammen eine kleine 2 Zimmer-Wohnung. Wir ahnten, dass der Einzug Hitlers für uns die Katastrophe bedeutete, sahen die akute Gefahr deutlich und unmittelbar vor uns. Was nur irgend konnte, lief auf und davon, aber wir kamen nicht mehr weg. Die Reichen waren längst fort, die weniger Begüterten sind geblieben. Eine Selbstmordwelle beseitigte die Schwachen, die sich der drohenden Gefahr nicht gewachsen fühlten, der Rest wappnete sich mit ihrer ganzen moralischen Kraft, um durchzuhalten, was immer noch kommen möge. Wir machten noch einige verzweifelte Versuche hinauszukommen. Meine Schwester konnte mit einem illegalen Transport nach Palästina. Sie schreckte vor dem ungewissen Schicksal und den Strapazen zurück. Sie musste es mit dem Leben bezahlen. Mein Bruder, Auswanderungsberater, Fachmann in allen Frager der Emigration, half einigen Dutzenden Leuten hinauszukommen, er selbst blieb knapp vor dem Ziel stecken. Er musste es mit dem Leben bezahlen. Ich selbst hatte mit meiner Erna ein amerikanisches Affidavit, aussichtslos in der Quotennummer, und ein Visum nach Shanghai, aussichtslos in der Transportfrage. Aber das, war nicht das Entscheidende. Ich hatte einen Beruf, der mich hielt mit Tausend Fesseln. Nahe bei Brünn war eine Fabrik, die zu einem Flüchtlingslager umgewandelt war. Juden aus Wien, Juden aus dem Sudetenland, aus dem Burgenland und sonstwoher, verjagt von Haus und Hof, wurden hier zusammengetrieben und unter Gestapoaufsicht konzentriert. Sie durften das Lager nicht verlassen und wohnten unter unmenschlichen Bedingungen. Schlecht ernährt, schlecht gekleidet, ausgeraubt bis aufs letzte, ihrer Bewegungsfreiheit beraubt, geprügelt, geduckt, schienen uns diese Menschen als die Ärmsten der Armen. Mit Gruseln hörten die brünner Juden, die noch frei in ihren Wohnungen saßen und nach dem ersten Schock des Anschlusses sich langsam zu erholen begannen, die Schilderungen, wie diese Ärmsten der Armen in diesem Lager vegetierten, wie gerne hätten sie alle später mit ihnen getauscht. Das war etwas Neues, Ungeheuerliches für uns, aber auch eine Vorahnung dessen, was uns bevorstände. Der Arzt, der im Lager Dienst machte, lief eines Tages auf und davon, er konnte die Grausamkeiten der SS nicht mehr mitansehen. Ich wurde an seine Stelle berufen. Gegen alle Warnungen und Beschwerungen meiner Familie, nahm ich an und liebte meine Arbeit draußen bald so sehr, dass sie mich mit größerer Kraft festhielt, als mich die Notwendigkeit zur Auswanderung trieb. Trotz und gegen die SS-Henker, die täglich das Lager visitieren kamen, gelang es mir, ein Spital und eine Ambulanz einzurichten, eine Kinder - und Altersfürsorge zu organisieren und das Leben der Internierten soweit es ging zu erleichtern. Die Gestapo, als sie sah, dass ich mich nicht einschüchtern ließ, ließ mich gewähren und ich konnte sie sogar dazu bringen, mir in meinen Bemühungen behilflich zu sein, denn ich tat alles unter dem Deckmantel der Vermeidung von Epidemien. Und sie hatten eine Heidenangst vor der Verbreitung ansteckender Krankheiten, weil ja davon auch die deutschen Übermenschen nicht gefeit waren. Es kam auch damals dort schon zu Aktionen, wenn auch kleineren Ausmaßes. Von Zeit zu Zeit kamen sich die Herren SS, meist angeheitert, ein wenig unterhalten, ließen alte Männer stundenlang im Kreis laufen, oder turnen, zwangen Burschen vom Stockwerk herunterzuspringen u. ähnl. Wir waren entsetzt. Es war erste Mal, dass wir so etwas mit eigenen Augen sahen. Wie harmlos waren doch diese Unterhaltungen gegen das, was später kam.

insert_drive_file
Text from page2

Ich hatte nebenbei in Brünn meine Ordination, hatte enorm viel zu tun, hatte das unermessliche Glück, eine geliebte Frau bei mir zu haben, allmählich gewöhnten wir uns an diesen Zustand. Am 20. 6. 1941, an dem Tag, da die Deutschen in Russland einfielen, mussten wir, Erna und ich, im Auftrag der Gestapo nach Eibenschütz, wo sich das Flüchtlingslager befand, übersiedeln. Zuerst waren wir darüber sehr unglücklich, denn das bedeutete, dass ich die brünner Praxis und damit einen großen Teil meines Einkommens, aufgeben musste. Aber bald waren wir mit dieser Änderung zufrieden. Wir bekamen eine kleine, sehr nette Wohnung und wir richteten sie uns ganz nach unserem Geschmack ein. Es war ja eigentlich unsere erste eigene Wohnung. In der Kleinstadt draußen war der Hitlerterror nicht so zu spüren, denn es gab ja fast keine Deutschen da. Die tschechische Bevölkerung half uns, wo sie nur konnte, erstens, weil sie uns gerne hatten, zweitens aus Protest gegen die Deutschen. Eine zeitlang sah es fast so aus, als ob die Judenfrage überhaupt ein wenig in den Hintergrund käme. Wenn einige Wochen keine Aktionen stattfanden, atmete alles auf, man glaubte, der ärgste Terror wäre vorbei. Ich verdiente genug, um uns ein sorgenloses Leben zu gewährleisten, wir konnten unsere Leute in Brünn mit allem, damals schon knappen, Lebensmitteln versorgen und wir schickten fast täglich Pakete nach Wien. Dort waren Mutter Knoll, Bronja und ihre beiden Kinder sehr darauf angewiesen, denn dort ging es den Juden sehr viel schlechter. Dort hat auch schon längst etwas begonnen, was uns später um Ruhe und Schlaf bringen sollte - Transporte. Es ist schwer zu schildern, was dieses Wort Transporte aus den Juden machte. Kaum wurde es nur ausgesprochen, legte es sich wie ein Alp auf jeden Familie, auf jede Gesellschaft, man schaute einander erschrocken an, Angst und Entsetzen auf der Stirn. Denn Transporte hiess Zwangsdeportation nach Polen. Genaues darüber wusste man nicht, aber eines war sicher, es war etwas Schreckliches. Tausende Leute fuhren mit Pinkel und Packen in Viehwagen einem unsicheren, aber jedenfalls elenden Schicksal entgegen. Hie und da kamen Briefe oder Postkarten aus Polen, Hilferufe. Sie hungerten, froren, waren gehetzt von allen Teufeln. Näheres erfuhr man nicht, dann niemand getraute sich sie Wahrheit zu schreiben. Wir ahnten nur, dass die deportierten Juden in Ghetti zusammengedrängt wohnten und arbeiten mussten. Ihr Gepäck wurde ihnen geraubt, sie bekamen fast nichts zu essen. Meine Frau fand keine Ruhe. Täglich zitterte sie vor der Nachricht aus Wien, dass ihre Mutter oder die kleinen Kinder daran glauben mussten. Sie blieben aber vorläufig verschont. Erna organisierte aus Kiganen eine Hilfsaktion. Sie ging von Haus zu Haus, bat bettelte, packte Pakete und schickte sie ab, sie ging in ihrer neuen Aufgabe auf. Berge von Dankbriefen kamen. Bald gewöhnten wir uns auch daran und das Elend der Welt wurde zum Alltag.

Wir selbst lebten fast wie im Frieden. Zwar zwangen uns die sich überstürzenden Judenverordnungen und Judenverfolgungen täglich das Bewusstsein auf, dass Hitler im Begriff war sein Judenprogramm zu erfüllen, dass wir also todgeweihte sind, aber wir wollten es nicht spüren, wehrten uns dagegen, wir durchtränkten unsere Seelen mit unverwüstlichem Optimismus: Die ganze Zeit stand gegen Hitler, die ganze Welt also half uns und jeder Tag musste uns dem guten Ende näherbringen, das nicht mehr lange auf sich warten lassen konnte. Aber bald ging es wieder los, Schlag auf Schlag kam es über uns. In Brünn kam es zu Aktionen kleineren Ausmaßes. Straßenzüge wurden zerniert, alle Männer, die angetroffen wurden, verhaftet und weggeschleppt. Insgesamt 224 Mann. Binnen 6 Tagen kamen 222 stereotype telegrafische Todesnachrichten, sie waren in Mauthausen gestorben, Todesursachen: Angina, Herzschlag, Lungenentzündung. Die restlichen zwei sind ohne Todesnachricht verschwunden. Ähnliche Aktionen wiederholten sich. Dann war wieder einige Wochen Ruhe und das genügte, um den unbegründeten, oder zumindest verfrühten Optimismus wieder aufleben zu lassen.

insert_drive_file
Text from page3

Alle Juden und Menschen jüdischer Abstammung wurden registriert und ein für alle Mal von der übrigen Welt abgesondert. Ein unübersteigbarer Fall von Verordnungen separierte sie von der andern Welt. Eine Flut von Verboten und Gesetzen prasselte auf uns nieder. Zunächst mussten wir einen gelben Stern tragen, der jeden Gesetzesjuden weithin sichtbar kennzeichnete. Damit waren wir vogelfrei. Kein Arier durfte mit uns sprechen. Halbwüchsige Lausbuben überfielen die gezeichneten Frauen und Greise und schlugen sie blutig, in Rudeln überfielen sie auch Männer und misshandelten sie. Ich kam eines Abends von einem Kranken und wurde überfallen. Ich kam mit einem Nasenbeinbruch und einigen Hiebwunden davon. Meine Familie konnte mich nicht erkennen, als ich nach Hause gebracht wurde. Aber das Alles waren Episoden und Ereignisse, die wir hinnahmen und ertrugen in der Aussicht auf das baldige Ende, das ja nicht mehr lange auf sich warten lassen konnte. Die Juden bekamen einen eigenen Gesichtsausdruck der ließe sie erkennen, auch wenn sie den Stern nicht getragen hätten. Angst, Schrecken, Unruhe in den Augen, geduckt die Mauern entlang schleichend, jederzeit gewärtig, geschlagen, erschlagen zu werden. Nur innerhalb ihrer 4 Wände, unter sich, entspannten sich die Nerven, flammte ein Lachen auf, erzählte man sich verklärten Blickes von dem Tag der Befreiung, der kommen musste und bald kommen würde. Im Geist wurden unsere Peiniger gefangen, gehängt, bestraft, die bessere Welt, die wir erträumten, erstand vor unserem geistigen Auge. Nach 20 Uhr durfte kein Jude auf die Straße, kein Lokal, kein Kino oder Theater durfte von ihnen betreten werden. In der Straßenbahn durfte er nur auf der Vorderplatform des Beiwagens fahren. Blieb ihnen nur die abendliche gesellige Zusammenkunft, natürlich nur, so weit sie in einem Haus wohnten, denn über die Gasse wagten sie sich ja doch nicht. Und wieder Verordnung auf Verordnung. Juden durften keine Rauchwaren, kein Obst, kein Gemüse kaufen, ihre lächerlichen Lebensmittelrationen durften sie nur in gewissen Stunden einholen. Radioapparate, Pelze, Fotoapparate, Zollsachen, Ferngläser, Schmuck, Gold, Silver, Wertgegenstände mussten abgegeben werden. Jedes Umgehen dieser Verordnungen bedeutete sicheren Tod.

Aber alles ließ sich ertragen. Jedoch wie ein Alp lag auf allen die eine große Drohung: Transporte. In Wien waren sie zum alltäglichen Ereignis geworden. Von dort gingen zweimal wöchentlich je Tausend Menschen nach Polen. Unser Protektorat war bis nun verschont geblieben. Im Herbst 1941 schlug es bei uns ertstmalig ein. Zuerst mussten 4 Transporte Prag verlassen, zu je 1000 Menschen, nach Lodž. Die Auswahl war völlig willkürlich, Reiche, Arme, Gesunde, Alte, Kinder, Kranke. Nach jedem Transport, abgefertigt mit deutscher Gründlichkeit und Grausamkeit, hofften wir, dass es der Letzte war. Aber sie gingen weiter je länger die Pausen zwischen den Transporten dauerten, desto rascher war der Optimismus wieder da. Ganz ohne Grund. Denn mit unerbittlicher Regelmässigkeit ging Transport auf Transport ab. Am 19. 11. 1941 wurden die ersten Tausend Menschen aus Brünn abgefertigt. Mein Bruder musste mit. Was nützte es ihm, dass er Transportleiter wurde? Er musste mit seiner Frau hinein. Unvergesslich das Telefongespräch, in welchen wir voneinander Abschied nahmen, als scheide er für immer. Ich konnte nicht einmal die 30 km mit der Bahn nach Brünn fahren, um ihn noch einmal zu sehen, denn Bahnfahrten waren für Juden verboten. Wir ahnten beide, dass wir uns nicht mehr wiedersehen würden. Damals schwur ich zum ersten mal, nie mehr mit einem Deutschen Mitleid zu haben, wenn es so weit war. Er fuhr ab.

insert_drive_file
Text from page4

Sie kamen nach Minsk, Russland. Erst vorige Woche, in Wien, konnte ich mir das Bild seines dortigen Schicksals abrunden, als mir seine Briefe überreicht wurden. Die 80.000 Juden, die in Minsk ansässig waren, polnische und russische, wurden in Massenhinrichtungen ausgerottet. Unter unbeschreiblichem Terror mussten sie sich selbst ihre Massengräber graben, mussten sich in Winterkälte entkleiden und sich an den Rand der Gräber stellen. Dann wurden sie mit Maschinengewehren niedergeschossen, fielen getroffen rückling in das Grab. Die Leiber wurden von den nächsten Opfer mit Kalk beschüttet und verscharrt, gleichgültig, ob sie tot waren, oder noch lebten. Arische Augenzeugen berichten, dass sie noch Tage nachher die Erde sich bewegen sahen. Dann kam der nächste Schupp [Schub] an die Reihe, bis alles ermordet war. Unter dem Terror vorgehaltener Maschinenpistolen gruben sich Menschen ihr eigenes Grab, sie murrten nicht, sie lehnten sich nicht auf. Einige beteten, aber alle gingen hin, gruben aus, zogen sich aus und ließen sich niederschießen, fielen in die Gräber und starben. Menschen, mit Sinnen und Verstand-.- An Stelle dieser Unglücklichen wurden Juden aus ganz Europa importiert: Aus Hamburg, Berlin, Brünn, Prag. Sie besiedelten vom Neuen das ausgemordete Ghetto, aber nur, um bald darauf auch ausgerottet zu werden. Sie arbeiteten schwer und litten wie alle Schicksalsgenossen unsagbar unter Hunger und Kälte. Die Meisten krepierten von selbst, viele wurden umgebracht, einige hielten sich über Wasser. Darunter mein Bruder. Er war geschickt genug, nicht nur einen guten Arbeitsplatz zu bekommen, sondern er konnte auch unter höchster Lebensgefahr Lebenszeichen von sich geben. Es kamen insgesamt 8 Briefe von ihm, die so wie sie sind, gedruckt werden könnten. Schon im zweiten teilte er den Tod seiner über alles geliebten Frau mit. Sie musste sich einer Bauchoperation unterziehen, auf einem Küchentisch mit improvisierten Instrumenten. Ein guter Freund von mir führte sie aus. 8 Tage darauf starb sie an den Folgen. Was sie vorher mitgemacht hatten, deutet er nur an. Aktionen jagten einander, die, wie überall in Lagern und Ghetto den Zweck hatten, die Reihen dieser Ärmsten der Armen zu lichten, Alte, Kranke, Kinder, also den Ballast wegzuschaffen, aber die befohlene Zahl auch mit jungen und gesunden aufzufüllen, Platz zu schaffen für neu eintreffendes Schlachtvieh. Die weiteren Briefe sind die eines gebrochenen Mannes. Unter unendlicher Gefahr und Schwierigkeiten sandten ihm seine wiener Freunde Lebensmittel, die ihn am Leben erhielten. Es gehörte viel Geschicklichkeit dazu, den sich jagenden Aktionen auszuweichen. Das gelang ihm bis Oktober 1943. Zum Skelett abgemagert, er hatte über 30 kg verloren, tief deprimiert über den Verlust seiner Frau, seinem Schicksal ergeben, schrieb er seinen letzten, erschütternden Brief, in dem er seiner Ahnung über sein bevorstehendes Schicksal Ausdruck gibt. Der Vermittler seiner Post, der ihn sehr liebgewonnen haben musste, schreibt in zitternder Schrift Worte dazu, die keinen Zweifel offen lassen, dass auch er ermordet wurde, wie Hunderttausende andere. Bleibt zu hoffen, dass er dabei nicht leiden musste, genug was er bis dahin mitzumachen hatte.

Aber zurück zu uns. Transport auf Transport wurde abgefertigt, aus Brünn, Prag, aus der Provinz. Es sickerte durch, dass die Transporte nicht mehr nach Polen, sondern nach Theresienstadt gingen, einen Städtchen auf tschechischem Boden, dass dort ein Ghetto aufgebaut wird. Immer mehr Freunde mussten gehen, unsere Reihen lichteten sich. Die Transporte wurden laufend mit Buchstaben bezeichnet, die ersten mit A, dann B, C und so fort. Mein Bruder war mit Transport F abgegangen und vom Tag seiner Deportierung bis zu seinem Tode hatte er keinen Namen mehr, sondern er war die Nummer F 998 1Note 1 : F 994. Als sie mit dem Alphabet am Ende waren, kamen Doppelbuchstaben daran: Aa, Ab, Ac, usw. Wochen, Monate vergingen.Wir fühlten uns ziemlich sicher, denn von deutscher, wie von jüdischer Seite wurde und versichert, dass wir als unentbehrlich nicht deportiert würden. Ich war zugelassener jüdischer Arzt /nur ein kleiner Bruchteil jüdischer Ärzte durften die Praxis ausüben./ Und betraute

insert_drive_file
Text from page5

neben dem Lager eine Gruppe jüdischer Bergarbeiter, rüstungswichtig. Familien zerrissen sie damals nicht. Wenn jemand deportiert wurde, dann mit der ganzen Familie, oder die Familie blieb zu Hause.

So schrecklich die Transporte auch waren, wir sahen sie von Eibenschütz aus gleichsam nur aus der Ferne. Wir lebten dort weiter unser ruhiges, fast idyllisches Leben. Abseits von den Gräueln des Terrors, zurückgezogen in unsere liebgewonnene Wohnung, umgeben von guten Freunden, unterstützt und getragen von der offenen Sympathie der Einheimischen, vollauf beschäftigt in der befriedigenden Arbeit, lebten wir in der Hoffnung, dass wir diese schreckliche Zeit auf diese Weise überdauern werden, und lange konnte es je nicht mehr dauern. Im Feber 1942 kam der große Wendepunkt im Krieg: Stalingrad. Täglich bekamen wir unsere Berichte, studierten Zeitungen und Kommentare, hörten verbotene Auslandssendungen und sehnsüchtig zählten wir die Tage, wie lange es noch dauern könnte. Wir waren uns der bösen Zeit bewusst und doch konnte keiner ahnen, was uns erwartete. Wir sahen das Elend des Lagerlebens in Eibenschütz vor uns, aber wir sahen auch, dass es möglich war, ihr Schicksal, vor allem das der Kinder und Kranken, zu erleichtern, ja sogar besser zu gestalten, als das, der jüdischen Kinder in der Freiheit draußen, dann auch diese waren durch Judenstern und Verbote jeder Art, gehemmt. Auf dem Boden dieses Lebens kamen wir nach reiflicher Überlegung zu dem Entschluss ein Kind zu haben. Wir vertrauten auf das unaufhaltsam sich nähernde Kriegsende. Wir vertrauten auf uns selbst. Ernas Schwangerschaft ließ sie aufblühen, wie noch nie. Noch nie hat sie so gut ausgesehen, nie war sie so kräftig, so schön, wie in dieser Zeit. In ihrer gewohnten Gewissenhaftigkeit bereitete sie alles vor. Ich brauche auch nicht zu sagen, dass sie, wie alles anders, das sie in die Hand nahm, auch ihre Wirtschaft mustergültig versah. Die Zeiten waren schwer, sie hatte keine Hilfe, sie musste in der Ordination aushelfen und den ganzen Haushalt versorgen. Sie entpuppte sich als ausgezeichnete Köchin, Peppi hätte ihre Freude gehabt, hätte sie sie in ihrem neuen Element gesehen. Es ist schwer zu schildern, wie glücklich wir, trotz allem, in diesen Monaten gelebt haben. Draußen tobte die Flut, Mord, Brand, Elend, Terror, aber sie schien halt zu machen vor den Türen unseres Heimes, das wie eine Insel des Friedens und des Glücks nicht nur uns, sondern auch unseren Freunden eine Zufluchtsstätte bot. Die Schwangerschaft näherte sich ihrem Ende, da stürzte es über uns zusammen. Zuerst, am 27. 3. 1942 wurde meine Mutter zur Nummer Af 261, sie musste in die Schleuse einrücken. Kaum hatte ich von ihr Abschied genommen, waren auch wir einberufen. Von allen Seiten wurde uns zugesichert, dass sei ein Irrtum, wir sollen nicht packen, denn wir waren unentbehrlich. Der deutsche Direktor das Kohlenbergwerkes telephonierte und telegraphierte und teilte mir mit, ich wolle auf seine Verantwortung von Transport fernbleiben. Ich tat es nicht und kurz darauf waren auch alle jüdischen Bergarbeiter eingereiht. Erna sollte in den nächsten Tagen niederkommen, sie hatte schon große Beschwerden. Sie packte für uns drei, denn auch für das Kind musste alles mitgenommen werden. Sie bug, wusch, ordnete, versteckte, nähte Schmuck und Gold ein, war überall und machte alles. Sie schlief nicht drei Tage und drei Nächte, dann waren auch wir in der Schleuse. Meine Schwester mit ihrem Gatten neben uns, ordneten wir uns in der Schule ein, die zu diesem Zwecke freigemacht werden war. Als wie wir durch das Tor der Schule schritten, schloss sich hinter uns die freie Welt. Wir konnten nicht wissen, dass kaum 1 Promill derer, die durch dieses Tor geschritten sind, den Krieg überleben würden.

Der Sturz aus dem friedlichen Leben unserer Wohnung und unserer Stellung in die Deportation, war ein ungeheurer. Mir selbst konnte es nicht viel anhaben, denn ich war nicht verwöhnt und sporttrainiert. Aber die Frau in diesem Zustand, das war fürchterlich. In verdunkelten Räumen lagen Hunderte in Klassenzimmern auf der Erde. Kälte, SS-Terror mit Schießen und Prügeln, um uns einzuschüchtern. In endlose Prozeduren mussten wir abgeben, was noch an normales Leben erinnerte.

insert_drive_file
Text from page6

Lebensmittelkarten, Geld, alle Dokumente, Wohnungsschlüssel, Wertsachen. Nach drei Tagen wurden wir nachts, damit die Bevölkerung nicht sieht, was mit uns geschieht, in Reihen aufgestellt und zum Bahnhof gejagt. SS-Posten hatten ihren Spass daran, alte Leute mit Schlägen zum Laufen anzutreiben, sie zu verhöhnen und zu verspotten. Wir kamen in unsere Waggons, die jüdische Hilfsorganisation hatte mustergültig gearbeitet, alles Gepäck war nach Nummern geordnet in unserem Kupes verstaut und wir fuhren nicht allzu schlecht 12 Stunden nach Theresienstadt. Ah 711, des war einmal meine Frau, sass neben Ah 712 und war glücklich darüber, dass ich bei ihr bleiben durfte, denn man munkelte, dass Männer und Frauen voneinander getrennt würden. Ah 713 und Ah 714, Schwester und Schwager, fuhren mit uns. Der erste Schock war überwunden und wieder siegte unser Lebenselixier, der Optimismus, die freudige Erwartung der baldigen Befreiung.

In Theresienstadt angelangt, hörten wir, dass meine Mutter vor 3 Tagen gut angekommen ist. Am Bahnhof wurden wirklich Männer und Frauen getrennt. Der leitende Arzt von Theresienstadt erkannte mich und ließ Erna in Anbetracht ihres Zustandes sofort in die Frauenkaserne überführen, sofort, dass hieß, er ersparte ihr den 3 tägigen Aufenthalt in der Schleuse. Bevor die Neuankömmlinge in das Ghetto eingelassen und aufgenommen wurden, mussten sie durchgeschleust werden, eine Art Quarantäne, die aber hauptsächlich dazu diente, um das Gepäck zu revidieren und zu konfiszieren. Medikamente, Werkzeug, Instrumente, Rauchwaren, Konserven, Lebensmittel, Batterien, Kerzen, Zünder und vieles andere wurde geschleust. Dieser Ausdruck jedem Ghettoinsassen ein geläufiges Wort und jedem Art von Gewonnen wurde schleusen genannt, einer der wichtigsten begriffe in Theresienstadt überhaupt. In dieser Schleuse lagen wir zu Hunderten auf der Erde, etwas Stroh unter uns. Ein alter brünner Freund machte Dienst bei der Ghettowache und er half mir gleich am ersten Tag, mich in die Frauenkasserne zu schmuggeln, in der Erna untergebracht war. Wie glücklich war ich sie wiederzusehen. Meine Mutter hatte sie gleich in Empfang genommen, ihr eine Art Bett bereitet und sie halbwegs wohnlich untergebracht. Es war also doch nicht so arg, was machte es aus, dass wir Männer wie die Schweine schliefen, lebten, frassen, die Frauen hatten es besser und vor allem, sie blieben in unserer greifbaren Nähe. Wir sehen auch, dass unsere Vermutungen bezüglich der Kinder richtig gewesen sind und dass die Leitung des Ghettos sich um ihr Wohlergehen ebenso kümmerte, wie ich es seinerzeit im Flüchtlingslager getan hatte, und der Krieg konnte doch nicht mehr lange dauern. Wir fassten Mut und sahen den Dingen, die kommen sollten, gefasst entgegen.

Am 4. 4. 1942 kamen wir in Theresienstadt an, am 9. 4. kam unser Sohn zur Welt. Morgens teilte mir Dr. H., der Frauenarzt, der Erna betreute, mit, dass die Wehen begonnen hätten und dass gegen Abend die Geburt zu erwarten sei. Ich erkämpfte mir einen Durchlassschein in die Frauenkasserne für 5 h. Der Gendarm, der den Schein beim Tor prüfte, fragte: Ah, sie sind der, der den Buben bekommen hat? So erfuhr ich, dass alles schon vorüber war und dass wir einen Buben hatten. Er ist um 1 h mittags zur Welt gekommen. Ich stürmte in das Kreisszimmer, und fand eine sehr blasse, aber überglückliche Erna im Bett liegen. Sie war so entblutet, dass ich das Kind zunächst gar nicht sehen wollte. Die Geburt war leicht, aber es trat eine Nachgeburtskomplikation ein, sie musste operiert werden und ist dabei fast verblutet. Jetzt aber war alles in Ordnung. In Ordnung? Sie hatte in einem Kassernzimmer geboren, auf einem geliehenen Eisenbett, 3 Stunden nachher musste sie wieder auf ihre Ubikation, wie man die Wohnräume dort nannte, zusammen, mit 12 2Note 2 : number is unclear anderen Frauen, die zum Teil nach der Entbindung, zum Teil knapp davon waren. Sie konnte sich nicht an die Umgebung gewöhnen, trotzdem hielt sie sich tapfer. Worte können nicht schildern, was für eine Frau sie war und was sie geleistet hat.

insert_drive_file
Text from page7

Sowie sie alles mustergültig durchführte, was sie in die Hand nahm, so war es auch mit ihrer Mutterschaft. Sie musste drei Wochen liegen bis sie so weit beisammen war, dass sie aufstehen konnte. Sie ließ es sich nicht nehmen, das Kind zu stillen, sie versorgte es, wie kein anderes Kind versorgt war. Sie war die Mustermutter, das Kind das Musterkind. Wir nannten ihn Michael Josef nach Ernas von den Nazis ermordetem Bruder. Er war das schönste Kind, das in Theresienstadt zur Welt kam /insgesamt kamen dort 296 3Note 3 : number is unclear Kinder zur Welt/. Meine Schwester und meine Mutter halfen Erna nach Kräften, trotzdem war es sehr schwer. Ständig neue und neue Hindernisse waren zu überwinden, bevor Mutter und Kind versorgt waren. Das Wasser musste 2 Stockwerke hoch geschleppt werden, dann Kohle, Holz, ein Ofen, eine Stellage, Kinderbett und Wickeltisch, und Hundert andere Dinge, mussten erst beschafft werden. Sei es geschleust sei es neu angefertigt, bezahlt wurde mit Lebensmitteln, die doch schon so knapp waren. Wir bekamen zu essen: 330 g Brot, schwarzer Kaffee, 2 wässerige Suppen, 300 g Kartoffeln mit etwas Sauce oder Gemüse. Arbeitende bekamen etwas mehr Brot und etwas Margarine. Aber wir hatten noch einige Vorräte von zu Hause mitgebracht, außerdem begann ich als Arzt zu arbeiten und konnte bald soviel verdienen, dass ich es schaffen konnte. Aber alles ging nur, weil Erna sich unermüdlich rackerte, dabei wiederstand ihr das Essen und es war kein Wunder, dass sie ziemlich herunterkam, da sie von Schonung nichts hören wollte.

Leider zeigte es sich bald, dass Theresienstadt nicht die Endstation war. Sowie Transporte ankamen - und es kamen wöchentlich 2-3 - wurden gleich starke wieder weggeschickt, nach dem Osten. Zurückblickend konnten nur schwer Kranke und Leute 4Note 4 : illegible Freunde haten 5Note 5 : illegible. Auch Familien mit kleinen Kindern waren geschützt.

Wir hatten also nichts zu befürchten und auch dadurch, dass ich als Arzt arbeitete, kamen wir in keinen Transport. Aber schon am 28. 4. 1942 musste meine Schwester mit ihrem Mann in einen Osten-Transport. Es wäre möglich gewesen, sie heraus zu bekommen, aber sie wollte nicht. Sie litt so sehr unter der Trennung von ihrem Mann, sie durften einander doch nicht sehen, da Männer und Frauen streng separiert wohnten und arbeiteten, so dass sie weg wollte, in der Hoffnung, an ihrem neuen Bestimmungsort zusammen sein zu dürfen. Meine Schwester schrieb noch 3 Karten aus der Gegend von Lublin. Sie hat ihren Mann seit der Fahrt nicht gesehen. Dann waren die beide verschollen.

Doch das Leben ging weiter. Wir fanden Trost in unserem Kind, das uns viel Sorgen machte und doch gedieh. Juden aus ganz Europa wälzten sich nach Theresienstadt, wurde geschleust, gesiebt und weitergeschickt. Junge Menschen kamen nicht über Theresienstadt, sondern wurden direkt aus Wien, Hamburg, Berlin, München und anderen Städten nach Polen in ihr Verderben geschickt. Nur Menschen über 65 Jahre kamen nach Theresienstadt, um hier zu sterben, oder von hier einem Osten-Transport zum Opfer zu fallen. In den heißen Sommermonaten brach eine Ruhrepidemie aus, Hunderte starben täglich in den voll gepferchten Ubikationen, die Leichen konnten nicht rechtzeitig weggeschafft werden, weil ihrer zu viele waren. Ein Krematorium wurde gebaut, weil die Totengräber nicht nachkamen. Die Epidemie griff auch auf das Säuglingsheim über und fast die Hälfte aller Kinder starben. Im Juli bekam Erna Masern. Diese Krankheit ist für Erwachsene schwer und sehr gefährlich. Sie war in großer Gefahr und dazu steckte sie das Kind an. 48 Stunden sah es so aus, als ob beide verloren wären. Zuerst erholte sich die Mutter, dann aber bekam das Kind die befürchteten Durchfälle. Drei bange Tage und ebenso viel endlose Nächte kämpften wir für sein Leben. Und er wurde gesund. Was wollten wir noch mehr? Wir haben unser Kind zum zweitenmal wiederbekommen. Alles andere war uns auch g. Dazu 6Note 6 : end of the line is missing kam eine weitere freudige Überraschung. Am 6. Juli kam mit einem Wiener Transport still, bescheiden und sehr mager Mutter Knoll. Könnt Ihr euch vorstellen, wie glücklich Mutter und Tochter in all dem 7Note 7 : end of the line is missing

als sie sich fanden. Von Bronja und ihren Kindern berichtete 8Note 8 : end of the line is missing die direkt nach Polen geschickt wurden. Wir wussten damals noch nicht, dass Polen den sicheren Tod bedeutete, und hofften immer auf ein Wiederse-

insert_drive_file
Text from page8

hen. Und auf eine schließliche glückliche Wiedervereinigung.

Indessen besserten sich die Verhältnisse in Theresienstadt einigermassen. Waren anfangs nur einige alte Kasernen für die Juden zugänglich und bewohnbar, wurde später die ganze Stadt von Juden besiedelt, nachdem die arische Bevölkerung zwangsweise evakuiert worden war. Damit fiel auch das Ausgehverbot.

Und wir konnten uns frei in der Stadt bewegen, konnten also unsere Familien besuchen und sehen wann wir wollten. Die Kinder durften in die Gartenanlagen und wenn auch die Verpflegung so knapp war, dass man verhungern musste, es gab Mittel und Wege, sich zuzubessern. Alte, alleinstehende Leute waren verloren, sie starben früher oder später an Hunger und Entkräftung. Aber wo ein junger Mensch in der Familie war, der konnte allerhand schaffen und verbessern, sei es bessere Schlafplätze, sei es Kleidungsstücke, sogar etwas mehr zu essen. Ich hatte Frau und Kind, Mutter und Schwiegermutter, dazu zwei Tanten zu versorgen. Es war schwer, aber es ging. Das Kind wurde bald Mittelpunkt, um und auf der ganzen Familie, unsere Hoffnung, unsere Stolz. Mutter, Großmutter, Tanten aber auch Patienten und Patientinnen wetteiferten, ihm alles zu verschaffen, was er brauchte. So ging es halbwegs weiter und es schien wieder einmal, dass das Ärgste überstanden sei. Da begann Erna zu kränkeln. Der schwere Blutverlust bei der Geburt, später die körperliche Arbeit ohne richtige Ernährung, später die schwere Masernerkrankung, sie verfiel zusehends. Längst hatte sie nicht mehr das blühende Aussehen der Schwangerschaft. Sie begann zu husten und eines Tages war es klar: sie hatte einen Befund auf der Lunge. Das war so ziemlich das Ärgste, das in Theresienstadt zustoßen konnte. Nicht nur, dass dort alle Vorbedingungen zur Ausheilung fehlten, nämlich gute Lufte, reichliche Kost und Ruhe, - vor allem musste sie sofort vom Kind weg, um es nicht zu gefährden. Wisst ihr, was das heißt, unter solchen Umständen als junge Mutter vom Kind getrennt zu werden? Ich glaubte, sie würde es seelisch nicht aushalten. Es dauerte Wochen, bis wir sie überzeugen konnten, dass sie gesund werden müsste, bis sie den Willen aufbrachte, gesund zu werden. Es wäre eine lange Geschichte, zu berichten, wie ein Liegestuhl aufgetrieben wurde, wie der Kampf um das Essen begann, wie wir alle so manchen Tag hungerten, um ihr und ihrem Kind das Nötige einzutauschen. Was kostete es für Mühe, sie zum Essen zu bewegen, da sie nichts nehmen wollten, was wir uns abgespart hatten. Wir mussten das Blaue vom Himmel herunterlügen, wieviel wir zu essen hatten, das niemand zu kurz käme, um sie so weit zu bringen. Sie bekam Eier, Butter, Obst, Dinge, die sonst nur vom Hörensagen bekannt waren. Sie begann sich zu erholen. Glücklicherweise besserte sich unser Zustand weiterhin dadurch, dass Post gestattet war, und sogar Pakete geschickt wurden. Unsere tschechischen Freunde schickten uns mit großer Gefahr (denn es war ein Gefahr Juden zu helfen) schöne Lebensmittelpakete. Monat um Monat vergingen, kritische, sorgenvolle Wochen. Aber Erna war bald außer Gefahr und es geschah das Wunder, sie wurde wieder gesund. Wieder bekam sie Farbe im Gesicht, wieder wurde sie rund und lebensfroh. Ihr Befund verschwand so gut wie völlig und voll Hoffnung sprachen wir wieder von unserer schönen Zukunft, bis endlich der elende Krieg aus ist, wie lange konnte er denn noch dauern? Das Kind gedieh uns überraschend gut. Die Schwestern, die ihn betrauten, liebten und pflegten ihn aufopfernd.

Ich weiss, eigene Eltern sehen ihre Kinder nicht objektiv genug, aber unser Mischa war ein besonders gut gelungenes Menschenexemplar. Er war ein ausgesprochen schönes Kind, klein und gedrungen von Statur glich er sonst der Mutter sehr, er hatte ihre dunkle Hautfarbe und dazu ihre hellen großen Augen, eine winzige kaum sichtbare Nase und perlenweisse Zähne. Er begann bald zu laufen und zu sprechen, natürlich nur tschechisch. Seine Mutter lernte fleissig diese so schwere Sprache mit ihm, weil sie wusste, sie werde sie in Zukunft brauchen. Mutter und Kind waren ein so erfreulicher Anblick und eine bekannte Erscheinung in Theresienstadt.

insert_drive_file
Text from page9

Unvergesslich mein 34. Geburtstag, als beide, ganz in weiss gekleidet, beide je einen Blumenstrauß in der Hand, mich von der Arbeit abholten, um mir zu gratulieren, wie empört mein Sohn war, als er die Blumen, die er mir überreichte, nicht sofort zurückbekam. Mischa war der erklärte Liebling aller, er hatte einfach alles, was ein Kind braucht, er war gekleidet wie ein Prinz, hatte fast täglich einen neuen Anzug an, ich glaube nicht, dass er in Freiheit besser genährt oder ausgestattet gewesen wäre. Er war ein ungemein gutes Kind und erinnerte uns häufig an Norberti, als er noch klein war. Er weinte so gut wie nie, auch wenn er krank war nicht. Er verlieh gern und oft seine Spielsachen, was bei Kindern selten ist. Er liebte seine Großmütter über alles. Er war glücklich, wenn er seine Umgebung zum Lachen bringen konnte und wandte dazu sein ganzes beträchtliches Schauspielertalent auf. Er machte uns viel Sorgen, aber alles war wettgemacht durch das unsagbare Glück, dass er seiner Umgebung spendete.

Wieder vergingen Monate und mit jedem Tag kam die heiß ersehnte Befreiung um einen Schritt näher. Das Ghetto wurde verbessert und verschönert. Es wurde zum Aushängeschild, zum Musterghetto ausgebaut. Man erwartete eine Internationale Kommission und vor der wollte man Zeigen, wie gut es den Juden geht. Parkanlagen entstanden, Kinderheime mit Spielplätzen und Plantschbecken, Brausebäder, Platzkonzerte mit Korso, Theater, Konzerte, ein Kaffeehaus wurden aus dem Boden gestampft. Wenn auch der Zweck klar war, wir wurden doch Nutzniesser. In Theresienstadt waren die besten Künstler Europas interniert, die Darbietungen hatten also ein wirklich gutes Niveau. Wir hörten Konzerte, die nicht so bald vergessen werden können. Zwei Fußballplätze, auf welchen Meisterschaften ausgefochten wurden, entstanden. Dort wurden auch Sportfeste gefeiert, z.B. am Lag Baomer. Die Kommission kam, besichtigte alles mit nachsichtigen Lächeln, sie liessen sich nichts weiß machen. Kaum waren sie weg, brach der Zauber zusammen. Wieder hieß es: Transporte. Wann immer wir einige Tage vergaßen, dass wir in einem Konzentrationslager interniert sind, wenn es hieß, Transporte gehen, mit einem Schlag war alles verändert. Verängstigt schlichen die Leute durch die Straßen, flüsternde Gruppen standen, beisammen, geduckt erwartete man bis die Liste ausgetragen wurde, immer wieder das gleiche Bild: Angst, Schrecken, Bist du drin? Nein, ich bin nicht drin, ich bin geschützt. Meine Mutter ist drin! Hast du schon reklamiert? Ja, aber es ist aussichtslos, überall dasselbe Gesprächsthema, dasselbe Hasten, dieselbe Aufregung. Überstürzt wird gepackt, kaum ist die Liste ausgetragen sieht man wieder das ach so häufige Bild. Schwer bepackte Gestalten, die Nummerntäfelchen um den Hals, wandern zur Schleuse, einer Kaserne, die die unglücklichen Opfer aufzunehmen hatte, die ins Ungewisse, d. h. in den sicheren Tod, fahren mussten. Kaum waren alle dort versammelt, schlossen sich die Tore, sie gehörten nicht mehr zu uns, sie waren der Fremdkörper, der ausgestossen werden sollte, und nun erst einmal abgesondert, demarkiert, separiert war. Dann werden sie einwaggoniert, die Waggons plombiert und weg ist der Transport. Und jetzt geschieht das Wunder. Alles atmet erleichtert auf, was weg ist, ist weg. Wohl weint hier ein Mädel, die ihre Eltern hat müssen ziehen lassen, dort ein Mütterchen, der ihr Sohn weggefahren ist. Aber das Leben in Theresienstadt geht weiter, diesmal ist es noch gut ausgefallen. Wann um Gottes Willen geht der nächste Transport? Ach was, bis dahin kann der Soff 9Note 9 : end sein, jeder Tag ist gewonnenes Leben. Aber immer nach drei Monaten gingen 1-2 Transporte ab und immer wieder dasselbe, grausame Spiel. 200.000 Menschen sind nach Theresienstadt gekommen, 30.000 lebten jetzt dort, alle anderen sind mit Transporten weggegangen. Achtmal war meine Mutter eingereiht, achtmal konnte ich sie dank meiner Stellung und meiner Verbindungen herausreklamiern. Am 13. 12. 1943 war sie und Mutter Knoll im Transport. Diesmal waren alle Bemühungen vergeblich. Hatte denn das Elend niemals ein Ende? Ich gab ihr Injektionen um künstliches Fieber zu erzeugen und sie dadurch transportunfähig zu machen. Umsonst. Sie musste fahren. Sie hielt sich Heldenhaft, ja sie wäre froh und mutig gefahren, nur der Abschied vom Kind fiel ihr sehr schwer. In der letzten Nacht, die ich bei ihr der Schleuse verbrach-

insert_drive_file
Text from page10

te, gestand sie, dass die Monate, die sie mit uns und ihren Liebling, unserem Mischa verbringen durfte, trotz allem Elend der Deportierung zu den glücklichsten ihres Lebens gehörte.- Wir wussten nicht, was sie erwartete, wir hofften aber, dass sie die kurze Zeit bis zu unserer Befreiung durchhalten werden, hofften auf ein Wiedersehen. Wir haben sie nicht wiedersehen. Der Transport kam nach Birkenau Auschwitz. Wir schmuggelten schwarze Briefe hinaus und erbaten Lebensmittelpakete für beide Mütter. Über 30 Pakete wurden geschickt, sie haben keine erhalten. Sie gingen kurz nach ihrer Ankunft an Hunger zugrunde.

Wie fehlten uns die Mütter! Aber das Kind haft über alles hinweg. Unser Leben normalisierte sich ein wenig. Es ging uns eigentlich immer besser. Was bisher die Mütter hatten, kam jetzt dem Kind und Erna zugute. Wir bekamen wertvolle Pakete und vor allem, wir bekamen geheim und unter Gefahr Zeitungen und Berichte von draußen. Und wir wussten, es geht dem Ende entgegen. Die Front näherte sich vom Osten, die Invasion gelang. Wir erwarteten den Zusammenbruch täglich.- Ich hatte mir einen Pferdestall allein in ein Kämmerlein umgebaut, das hatten wir für uns. Welche glückliche Stunden verbrachten wir dort zu dritt. Die Zukunft lag in den schönsten Farben vor uns, am liebsten sprachen wir von unseren Lieben in der ganzen Welt, wie wir sie wohl wiedersehen würden und wie stolz wir ihnen unseren Stolz vorführen würden. Alles schien sich zu richten. Wohl schmerzte es, dass Schwester, Brüder und nun auch die Mütter von uns getrennt waren, dass sie nicht mehr lebten, daran dachten wir nicht. Nur das Ende kam so langsam, so langsam, zu langsam. Als wir schon nicht mehr an diese Möglichkeit dachten, kam die Katastrophe. Im Herbst 1944 kam der Befehl: 5.000 junge Männer müssen ins Reich zur Arbeit, also wieder Transporte. Insgesamt waren nur etwa 5.400 Männer da, d.h. dass also praktisch alle gehen mussten. Bald aber zeigte es sich, dass es diesmal etwas war, was Theresienstadt noch nicht gesehen hat. In Abständen von 3 Tagen ging Transport auf Transport, zuerst nur Männer, dann ihre Frauen und Kinder, später wahllos alles unter 65 Jahre. Ich kam auf die sogenannte blaue Schutzliste, eine Liste der Leute, die als unentbehrlich in Theresienstadt bleiben musste. Wieder ließen wir uns, wie seinerzeit in Eibenschütz in Sicherheit wiegen. Und nach jedem Transport, der abgefertigt war, hoffte man: das war der Letzte. Aber es gab kein Ende, es glich einer Evakuierung. Kein Mensch wusste, wohin die Transporte gehen, was mit ihnen geschieht. Waren wir so verblendet, waren wir wirklich keines logischen Gedanken mehr fähig. Das es etwas Schlechtes war, wussten wir, man sprach von neuen Ghetti, von Frauen- und Kinderlagern in der Nähe der Arbeitsstätte, wo die Männer arbeiten sollten. Ein Herumraten, kein Mensch wusste, um was es geht. Nur die Allerobersten wussten es und die schwiegen wie ein Grab. Theresienstadt war nicht wieder zu erkennen. Es leerten sich die überfüllten Wohnräume, überall wurde gepackt, ein Chaos weggeworfener und zurückgelassener Dinge. -

Am 19. Oktober 1944 ereilte uns das Schicksal, wir drei wurden in den neunten Transport dieser Serie eingereiht. Elf sind insgesamt abgegangen. Es war ein harter Schlag, aber wir behielten den Kopf oben. Das Kind war groß genug für eine Reise, Erna war wieder gesund und kräftig und ich selbst, von mir musste nicht die Rede sein. Und wie lange konnte der ganze Spass noch dauern? Nein, wir ließen uns nicht niederkriegen. Umsichtig und tüchtig wie immer, packte Erna unsere Sachen zusammen. Mischa hatte eine unbändige Freude, er war entzückt, endlich im Zug fahren zu können.

Am 1. 4. 1942 hatte unsere Freiheit ein Ende. Am 19. 10. 1944 unser Leben. - Die Zustände während das Transportes lassen sich nicht beschreiben. 92 Personen eingepfercht in einem Waggon zusammen mit allem Gepäck, versperrt ohne Klosset, fast ohne Wasser, fuhren wir 2 Tage und 3 Nächte. Im Morgengrauen des 22. Oktober fuhren wir langsam an die Rampe

insert_drive_file
Text from page11

von Auschwitz ein. Auschwitz, das klang bös, dass war bekannt, als eines der ärgsten Konzentrationslager. Wie aber konnten wir wissen, was Auschwitz wirklich war. Worte können das niemals schildern, keine noch so krankhafte Phantasie kann sich ausmalen, was dort geschah. Um es kurz zu machen: in die Wagen krochen bei Türen und Fenstern polnische Judenburschen in gestreiften Anzügen herein, brüllten uns an, wir sollen aussteigen und alles Gepäck liegen lassen. Sie begannen den Leute ihre Armbanduhren von den Händen zu reissen und schlugen auf sie ein, wenn sie sich zur Wehr setzten. Sie begannen ungeniert zu rauben und zu stehlen, was ihnen gefiel. Wir waren wie betäubt, vor den Kopf geschlagen. Erna versuchte mit ihnen jiddisch zu reden, sie würdigten sie keiner Antwort. Ausgestiegen hieß es, Männer hier, Frauen, und Kinder dort antreten. Ich nahm nur kurz Abschied von Frau und Kind und versprach ihnen, noch im Laufe des Tages zu ihnen zu kommen, ist es mir doch vor 2 Jahren in Theresienstadt auch gelungen alle Hindernisse hinweg zu Erna zu kommen, warum sollte es hier nicht gehen? Mischa war sehr gut gelaunt, denn alles Neue gefiel ihm wunderbar. Langsam bewegten sich die Kolonnen nach vorne. Dort standen drei hohe SS-Offiziere, unbewegte wächserne Totenköpfe, später erfuhr ich, dass einer von ihnen der berüchtigte Dr. Mengele war, Herr über Leben und Tod von Millionen Menschen. Zum erstenmal sah ich das grausame Spiel, das ich damals noch nicht verstanden und später noch so oft zu sehen bekommen sollte. Bei jedem Vortretenden zeigte er entweder nach rechts oder nach links. Die jungen, kräftigen Menschen wies er nach rechts, alte, Frauen mit Kindern und Kranke nach links. Mich schickte er rechts. Als ich sah, dass Frauen mit Kindern links gingen, schlich ich mich hinter seinen Rücken nach links hinüber. Ein SS-Posten sah das und jagte mich mit Fußtritten zu Mengele zurück. Herr Obersturmführer, ich bin Arzt, ich möchte zu den Kindern und Kranken. Ein prüfender Blick misst mich von Kopf bis Fuß, dann schickt er mich abermals nach rechts. Ich sah noch einmal meine Frau, ihren ausgelassen hüpfenden Sohn an der Hande, in der Kolonne der Frauen mit Kindern, dann waren sie meinen Blicken entschwunden. Hätte er mich nur mit ihnen gehen lassen! Ich wäre mit tausend anderen, wie Millionen vorher und nachher in das “Brausebad” geführt worden. Dort hieß es in Aufschriften in allen Sprachen Europas man möge sich die Nummer merken, wo die Kleider aufgehängt seien, damit sie nicht verwechselt werden. Entkleidet bekam jeder ein Stück Seife und ein Papierhandtuch in die Hand gedrückt und wurden dann in das Bad eingelassen. Ein Riesenraum mit Duschen, die von der Decke hingen. Nur musste es auffallen, dass 1500 Menschen dicht gedrängt hineingestopft wurden. Die Duschen waren keine Duschen, sie sahen nur so aus, waren Attrappen. Hinter dem letzten Badegast schlossen sich hermetisch die Türen und ein deutscher Held mit einer Gasmaske versehen, warf Blausäurobomben durch einen Schacht in den Raum. Dann beobachtete er durch ein Fensterchen den Erfolg. Hatte er genug Gas gewählt, dauerte es 13 Minuten, bis der letzte Schrei verstummte, manchmal aber sparten sie, dann dauerte es eine halbe Stunde oder mehr. Wie ist es wohl den Meinen ergangen? Hoffentlich haben sie nicht gewusst, wohin sie gehen. Ich sehe sie ständig vor mir, meine Frau, nackt, das Kind am Arm, ruhig, überlegen, engelhaft, in der Heiligkeit ihrer Mutterschaft, in der drängelnden Menge der nackten Körper. Ich sehe sie vor mir, im Augenblick des Vergehens, wie sie erschrocken das Kind an sich drückt, es zu schützen versucht, ich sehe sie dann im Tod vereint liegen, die Mutter meines Sohnes und meinen Sohn und ich bin tief traurig, das ich nicht mit ihnen dort liegen durfte, das ich jetzt nicht mit ihnen bin.

Was dann mit ihnen geschehen ist, war fürchterlich. Auf mächtigen Krähnen wurden die Leichenhekatomben ins Krematorium geschafft, jeder von einem der 50 Zahnärzte, die Tag und Nacht dort diese Arbeit vollstrecken, auf Goldzähne untersucht, die roh herausgestemmt werden. Dann in den Ofen damit. Zuerst die Kinder, die brennen am besten, dann Frauen, zuletzt Männer. Es konnte aber noch ärger sein. Es waren ins

insert_drive_file
Text from page12

gesamt sechs Krematorien in Betrieb. Nicht alle waren so human ausgestattet. War der Andrang zu groß, war kein Gas vorhanden, machte man keine langen Faxen. Es gab verschiedene Methoden, die Menschen umzubringen, angefangen von der Axt über den berühmten Genickschuss mit einer Federpistole, um Munition zu sparen bis zum gewöhnlichen Erschießen. Kleine Kinder wurden lebend ins Feuer geworfen. Das Gebrüll der Opfer vom Krematorium VI war stundenlang im ganzen Lager hörbar. Dieses Krematorium VI arbeitete sehr primitiv und wurde nur im Notfall benützt, nicht aus Sentimentalität, sondern um sich Scherereien zu ersparen. Die Opfer durften nicht wissen, was mit ihnen geschieht, weil sie sich sonst in ihrer letzten Verzweiflung zu Wehr setzen konnten. Krematorium VI sah aus wie ein Bauernhaus, in einem Wäldchen gelegen, umgeben von einem undurchsichtigen Bretterzaun. Neben dem Haus eine große Grube, in ihr Stroh, das mit Benzin überschüttet wurde. Hier wurden die Erschlagenen unter freiem Himmel verbrannt. Erst nachdem es zu Revolten und anderen unangenehmen Zwischenfällen gekommen war, wurde die Mordmaschine rationalisiert und auf die humanere Stufe gebracht. Das alles ist wahr, keine Ausgeburt krankhafter Phantasien.-

Aber das alles wusste ich nicht, erfuhr ich erst Wochen nach der Befreiung. Am grauen Morgen unserer Ankunft in Auschwitz gingen wir also nach rechts, 1500 Menschen waren wir in Theresienstadt einwaggoniert worden. 160 Männer und 40/60 10Note 10 : The number is illegible. Frauen gingen nach rechts. Auch wir kamen nach einstündigem Marsch in ein Bad. Aber schon der Weg belehrte uns, dass wir uns auf einer anderen Welt befanden. Rechts und links umsäumte ein doppelter 4 m hoher Stacheldrahtzaun mit großen Aufschriften: Achtung Hochspannung, nicht berühren, die Straße. Flankiert von SS-Posten mit schussbereiten Maschinenpistolen. Rechts und links hinter den Zäunen unendlich lange und unendlich öde Barackenreihen. Ihre Insassen durften die Baracken nicht verlassen, während wir durchmarschierten, keiner durfte mit uns reden. Aus einem Frauenblock schrie eine junge Frau zu uns herüber, wir sollen ihr etwas zu essen über den Zaun werfen. Eine Konserve, ein Laib Brot flogen hinüber. Da knallt ein Schuss und die Frau liegt tot in ihrem Blut. Weiter. Scheint eine alltägliche Angelegenheit zu sein, denn niemand regt sich darüber auf hinter dem Zaun. Ich versuche ein Gespräch mit dem Posten, der pfeifend neben mir hergeht, anzuknüpfen. Er ist nicht unfreundlich und erzählt mir auf meine Frage, wie es mit den Kindern hier geht: Mit den Kindern, ja, das war bisher schlecht. Jetzt aber ist es besser, sie haben eigene Heime, die Mütter wohnen mit ihnen zusammen, gehen tagsüber zur Arbeit. Sie haben ihre eigene Verpflegung und sind, wenn die Mütter arbeiten, betreut von älteren Frauen. Diese Auskunft beruhigte mich einigermassen und half mir leichter ertragen, was später kam. Ich will dabei nicht lang verweilen, denn was mir widerfuhr, ist nicht wichtig, ich habe alles durchgehalten, weil ich mein Kind wiedersehen wollte. Was immer von diesem Augenblick bis zu unserer Befreiung geschah, immer hatte ich das Kind vor Augen und wusste, ich musste am Leben bleiben. Es ist mir heute völlig unerklärlich, wieso ich am Leben geblieben bin.- Im Auschwitzer Bad, genannt Sauna wurden wir unter Pfiffen und Schlägen, unter Gebrüll und Geschimpfe des Letzten beraubt, was wir noch hatten: zuerst hatten wir abzuliefern: Geld und Gold, soweit wir es noch hatten, Eheringe, Uhren, Füllfedern. Ich zertrat meine Uhr und vergrub meine Füllfeder. Wir wurden einer neuerlichen Selektion unterzogen, wie das schöne Spiel genannt wurde, jenes Aussortieren, das wir erstmalig am Bahnhof bei Dr. Mengele erlebten und wo entschieden wurde, wer sofort sterben sollte oder wer unter langen Quälereien ins Arbeitslager geschickt werden sollte, um dort zu krepieren. Brille, Gürtel und Halbschuhe durften wir behalten, alles Übrige mussten wir abgeben. Sie durchsuchten alle Körperhöhlen nach versteckten Wertgegenständen. Dann wurden wir am ganzen Körper kahl geschoren und rasiert, kamen unter eine kalte Brause, hinausgejagt ins Freie bei eisiger Kälte. Zähneklappernd warten wir nackt, bis wir unsere neuen Monturen fassen. Verdreckte stinkende gestreifte Sträflingstrachten, sogenannte Pyjamas, häufig blut befleckt, vermutlich einem eben Tot geschlagenen ausgezogen. Dann wurden die

insert_drive_file
Text from page13

neuen Nummern in den Unterarm eintätowiert, gezeichnet fürs Leben. Bisher hieß ich Ah 712, ab jetzt schlicht 119224. Keine Wäsche, kein Mantel, keine Strümpfe. Sehr frierend starrten wir einander an und erkannten einander nicht. Nicht nur, dass wir geschoren und verkleidet waren, wie zu einem Maskenball, ein neuer Gesichtsausdruck war da. Nacktes Entsetzen, gepaart mit Angst, aber auch Entschlossenheit es ihnen heimzuzahlen, was sie da mit uns aufführen. Das also war die Arbeit im Reich auf die wir geschickt wurden? Viele fielen während der Prozeduren hin und standen nicht mehr auf, auch nicht, als die niedersausende Hundspeitsche blutige Striemen auf ihre Haut malte. Noch vor dem Badegebäude, exerzierten wir das wichtigste Kommando: Mützen ab, Mützen auf. Gebrüll, Prügel, Schüsse. Wo Mischa wohl jetzt ist? Ob Erna genug Decken hat? Ob sie schon etwas zu essen bekommen haben? Diese Sorgen gehen mit ständig durch den Kopf, da sie jetzt allein und ohne meine Hilfe sind. Eigentlich das erstenmal. Endlich, es ist bereits Abend, marschieren wir in unsere Baracken. Ich frage unseren Stubendienst, einen älteren Häftling, was er über die Kinder weiss. Was, dein Kind? Dort schau, dort hast du dein Kind! Er zeigt auf einen mächtigen Kamin, überall vom Lager aus sichtbar. Das grausige Symbol der Vernichtung. Riesenhaft, schwarz, in den Abendhimmel ragend, schlagen meterhohe Flammen aus ihm empor, obwohl er gute 20 m hoch ist. Siehst du, wie gut dein Kind brennt? Brauchst dir keine Sorgen mehr zu machen über Frau und Kind. Meine sind schon vor einem halben Jahr dorthin gegangen und wie du siehst, lebe ich noch. Was redet der Mensch da zusammen? Ist er verrückt geworden? Oder bin ich verrückt? Das ist doch nicht möglich, das ist doch…. Ich gehe wie betäubt die Lagerstrasse hinunter, treffe einen treuen Kamaraden aus Theresienstadt, der schon 3 11Note 11 : The number is illegible. Wochen hier ist. Völlig verstört berichte ich ihm, was ich eben gehört habe. Er lacht mich aus, das sei nicht wahr, zumindest übertrieben. Wohl würden Menschen vergast und verbrannt, aber nur alte Leute, Krüppel, arbeitsunfähige Menschen. Kinder und Frauen? Was fällt mir ein! Er selbst habe auf Außenkommando gearbeitet, in der Nähe des FKL (Frauen- und Kinderlager), er selbst habe gesehen, wie Kinder unter Aufsicht älterer Frauen gespielt haben, ihre Ubikationen seien sauber, weiss gestrichen. Ich solle mich doch nicht schrecken lassen. Das tun die Leute gerne hier. Er hatte Mühe, mich zu beruhigen und zu überzeugen. Aber, was der Mensch glauben will, glaubt er gerne. Trotzdem, der Stachel saß. Der Kamerad brachte weitere Augenzeugen herangeschleppt, die mir bestätigen mussten, dass auch sie die Kinder wohlauf gesehen hätten, die Frauen hätten sogar ihre Kleider behalten dürfen, wären auch nicht kahl geschoren worden. Das war doch alles ähnlich dem, was mir jener SS-Posten erzählt hatte und ich schöpfte neue Hoffnung. Und außerdem, sie waren doch auch Menschen, es ist ganz unmöglich, dass Menschen, auch wenn sie SS sind, unschuldige Kinder ermorden. Ich ließ keine Gelegenheit aus, späterhin jede mögliche Information einzuholen, was in Auschwitz mit Frauen und Kindern geschehen ist. War es die Klugheit der Berichtenden oder erschraken sie vor meinen fragenden Augen? Ich weiß es nicht, ich sammelte Aussage auf Aussage und kam immer mehr zu der Überzeugung, dass sie noch leben. Wie und wo, das wussten die Götter.

Vier Tage blieb ich in Auschwitz. Die Hölle kann nicht ärger sein. Wir bekamen nichts zu essen, weil unsere Fassungen von unserem Blockältesten für Schnaps und Frauen verschachert wurden. Ein schüchterner Protestversuch eines Häftlings endete damit, dass er halbtot geprügelt wurde. Er ist kurz darauf gestorben. Täglich Selektionen, manchmal auch zweimal am Tage. Schlafen zu sechst auf einer Pritsche, ohne Decke. Stundenlanges Apellstehen, Exerzieren, Schüsse, Prügel, Gebrüll. Selbstmörder stürzen sich in die Hochspannungsdrähte, hängen dort, verbrannt, stundenlang, tagelang. Nachts gejohle besoffener Blockältester. Und über all dem hoch in den Himmel ragend: das entnervende Bild des lodernd, rauchenden Kamins, der Brandgeruch versengten Fleisches. Wie konnte ich das aushalten? Immer wieder die bohrende Frage, brannten sie wirklich

insert_drive_file
Text from page14

nur alte Leute? Wann ist meine Mutter daran gewesen, wann die Tanten? Es war wie ein wühlender Traum.- Am fünften Tag wurden wir in einen Arbeitstransport rekrutiert. Von den 160 am Bahnhof Ausgewählten war kaum mehr die Hälfte übrig geblieben. Abermals 1500 Mann, herausgesucht aus vielen Transporten wurden wir unter scharfer Bewachung in vorbereitete Waggons gejagt, alles im Laufschritt, gestossen, gejagt, Schüsse. Jeder von uns fasst ein Laib Brot, eine Scheibe Wurst, ein Stück Margarine. Nach viertägigem Fasten stürzen wir uns darauf wie die Wölfe. Eingeklemmt in Viehwagen verschlingen wir unsere Fassung, um bald zu hören, das sei der Proviant für 3 Tag egewesen. Drei Tage eingezwängt in den dunkeln Viehwagen ohne Klosett, kein Wasser. Viele werden ohnmächtig, im Finstern tritt einer am anderen herum. Stehend schläft man ein paar Minuten, oder waren es Stunden? Durch Ritzen und Fugen versuchen wir die Fahrtrichtung zu erkennen. Mähren, Olmütz, Brünn. Wenn wir doch hier irgendwo blieben. Da ließe es sich gut davonlaufen. Hier sind wir zu Hause. Weiter. Wien, Neulengbach, St. Pölten. Sollte es nach dem gefürchteten Mauthausen bei Linz gehen? Linz. Langer Aufenthalt. Nein, weiter gehts, Salzburg, dann sind wir in Bayern. Wie lange fahren wir schon? Drei Tage oder sind es fünf? Wie viele Nächte, wie viele Tage? Plötzlich werden die Plomben aufgebrochen, die Türen aufgerissen. Raus! Schnell, schnell! Auf gehts, zu fünft, Vordermann, Seitenrichtung! Wie oft sollten wir noch dieses Kommando hören! Halb betäubt, zitternd vor Kälte, stolpern wir auf den Bahnsteig, strecken, schütteln die tauben Glieder. Es ist Nacht. Die Bahnhofuhr zeigt ½ 1 h. Ich entziffere den Namen der Station Kaufering. Wir marschieren, fünfzehn Gruppen zu hundert Mann eine halbe Stunde in ein Lager, wieder doppelter Stacheldrahtzaun, kleine Holzhütten, zum Teil unterirdisch als Bunker: wir erfahren, es ist ein Teillager zu Dachau gehörig. Wir bekommen Brot, heissen Kaffe. Hier bekommt man doch etwas zu essen! Mischa, ich werde dich wiedersehen. Wo du wohl bist? Ob deine Mutter bei dir ist? - Unser Transport, ausgewählte kräftige Männer, beginnt seinen Alltag im Arbeitslager. 14 bis 16 Stunden schwerste Arbeit täglich, ich arbeite als Erd- und Betonarbeiter. Fast nichts zu essen. Zuerst 300 g 12Note 12 : The number is illegible., später immer weniger Brot, 1 Lt. Wassersuppe war die Verpflegung für den Tag. Bittere Kälte, elende Kleidung, Schläge, stundenlanger Appell vor und nach der Arbeit, Strafexerzieren, Essensentzug, Erschiessungen, Selektionen. Wer krank ist oder nicht mehr weiter kann, wird nach Dachau in die Gaskammer geschickt. Ein Tag krank sein konnte das Leben kosten. Wir arbeiten mit Fieber, Durchfällen, eitrigen Händen und Füssen, offenen Erfrierungen, blutenden Wunden von den Schlägen und Kolbenhieben unserer Bewacher. Täglich werden wir weniger, neu ankommende Transporte, Ungarn, Littauer, Polen, füllen, die Lücken auf. Tag für Tag dasselbe. Aufstehen bei nächtlicher Dunkelheit, Apell bei klirrendem Frost, stundenlang, endlos. Eine Stunde Marsch zu Arbeit durch Kot, Schnee, Wasser, Eis, mit durchlöcherten Holzschuhen, ohne Strümpfe, viele auch barfuss. Auf gehts zu fünft, Vordermann, Seitenrichtung! Dann schwere pausenlose Arbeit, angetrieben durch Prügel, Schimpfen. Der Hunger wird unerträglich, die Finger frieren an den eisigen Schaufelstielen fest. Abends totmüde nach Hause ins Lager. Wieder Appell, dann die Wassersuppe hinuntergeschlungen. Die Leute fielen wie die Fliegen. Sie starben am Marsch, beim Essen, im Schlaf, beim Apell. Sie starben bei der Arbeit, unter den Hieben der Aufseher. Sie starben am Hunger, Ruhr, Ödemen, Herzschwäche. Kein freier Tag, jetzt wissen wir, wie weh Hunger tut. Die Läuse fressen uns auf, die Menschen werden zu Tieren, sie stehlen einander die Brotfassungen, sie schlagen sich gegenseitig blutig wegen ein paar verfaulter Kartoffelschalen. Wir fressen verfaultes Kraut, aus Misthaufen ausgegraben, so wie es ist, ungewaschen. Verschimmelte Brotrinden, von unseren Wächtern weggeworfen. Lebende Schnecken, wenn wir sie fanden, Gras. Der Hunger macht uns wahnsinnig. Zähne zusammengebissen, du musst durchhalten. Das Häuflein der Freunde aus Theresienstadt

insert_drive_file
Text from page15

wird kleiner und kleiner schmilzt zusammen. Neue Menschen kommen, sie kommen und sterben, kommen und sterben. Wie leicht ist es, aufzugeben. Man muss sich nur in den nassen Lehm fallen lassen, in den wir bei der Arbeit wadentief versinken. Dann wurde man entweder tot geprügelt oder wegen Arbeitsverweigerung erschossen, oder man bekam nur eine Lungenentzündung. Viele gaben es auf. Für mich kam das nicht in Frage. Ich sah den süßen Kopf meines Buben ständig vor mir, ich hörte ihn rufen: Tatínku pojď, seine Mutter hielt ihn an der Hand und sagte ruhig: Du wirst es aushalten. Ich habe es ausgehalten. Wie? Es ist mir ein Rätsel. Der Winter ging vorbei, im April begann sich die Front zu nähern. Die Kanonen wurden hörbar. Am 24. April schien sich alles aufzulösen, wir erwarteten unsere Befreier, wir gingen nicht mehr zur Arbeit. Da hieß es: das ganze Lager marschiert ab. In endlosen grauen gespenstischen Kolonnen setzte es sich in Bewegung. Seit mehr als 3 Jahren sahen wir zum erstenmal wieder Dörfer, Städte, normale freie Menschen. Unser Anblick musste schrecklich sein. Warum weinten alle, die uns sahen? Wir verstanden es nicht. Heute wissen wir, unser Anblick zwang ihnen die Tränen ab. Sie warfen uns Brot zu, die Wachen schossen nach ihnen, wir marschierten Tag und Nacht, ohne Verpflegung, flankiert von SS mit scharfen Bluthunden. Wenn es noch Steigerung der Grauen des Arbeitslagers gibt, auf diesem Dachauer Todesmarsch haben wir es erlebt. Die Leute sanken nieder, konnten nicht weiter, sie wurden erschossen. Brach einer in einer Stadt zusammen, bekam er eine Injektion, als ob er ärztliche Hilfe bekäme, in Wirklichkeit tötete man ihn auf diese unauffällige Weise. 15.000 Menschen sind zum Marsch aufgebrochen. Am 2. 5. befreiten uns die Amerikaner. 4.500 mehr tot als lebendig hatten nicht einmal die Kraft sich darüber zu freuen. Eingesunkene Augen starrten glanzlos aus ihren Höhlen auf dieses Glück, das sie nicht fassen konnten. Also doch, wir haben es also erlebt. Mischa, wo bist du, wo werde ich dich finden?- Von uns 1500, die wir von Auschwitz nach Kaufering kamen, lebten noch 6. Ich wog 42 kg 13Note 13 : The number is illegible.. Weiter.

Ich wurde englischer Dolmetsch, verschaffte mir einen Wagen und begann zu suchen. Es dauerte nicht lange und ich ahnte die ganze Wahrheit. In Frankfurt erfuhr ich, dass 500 14Note 14 : The number is illegible. jüdische Kinder, elternlos aus Konzentrationslagern in Paris seien, ein letzter Hoffnungsschimmer ohne Rücksicht auf alle Hindernisse schlug ich mich nach Paris durch. Dort erfuhr ich die ganze Wahrheit. Kein jüdisches Kind, keine jüdische Mutter hat Auschwitz lebend verlassen. Aus. Wozu habe ich alles ertragen? Wozu lebe ich noch? Es ist ein Irrtum, ich gehöre nicht hierher, ich gehöre hinüber, nach links, zum Kind, zur Frau.

Ich musste ins Spital, lag 6 Wochen wegen eines fieberhaften Herzleidens, dann fuhr ich nach Hause, nach Prag. Nach Hause?

References

  • Updated 9 months ago
The Czech lands (Bohemia, Moravia and Czech Silesia) were part of the Habsburg monarchy until the First World War, and of the Czechoslovak Republic between 1918 and 1938. Following the Munich Agreement in September 1938, the territories along the German and Austrian frontier were annexed by Germany (and a small part of Silesia by Poland). Most of these areas were reorganized as the Reichsgau Sudetenland, while areas in the West and South were attached to neighboring German Gaue. After these terr...
This collection originated as a documentation of the persecution and genocide of Jews in the Czech lands excluding the archival materials relating to the history of the Terezín ghetto, which forms a separate collection. The content of the collection comprises originals, copies and transcripts of official documents and personal estates, as well as prints, newspaper clippings, maps, memoirs and a small amount of non-written material. The Documents of Persecution collection is a source of informati...