Valerie Straussová, the death of a group of Jewish women in Upper Silesia

Metadata

Valerie Straussová was deported in autumn 1944 from the Terezín Ghetto to Auschwitz-Birkenau, where she was selected for forced labor and sent to Sława (Schlesiersee), a sub-camp of Gross-Rosen. At the end of January 1945, the camp was evacuated and she was forced on a death march with other inmates, during which a number of prisoners froze to death. Near Łupice (Osweide), around forty inmates who were unable to continue marching were shot and buried in a mass grave. Straussová was also shot, but wasn’t fatally wounded. She escaped and fled to the village of Wijewo, where she received help from the local inhabitants. Over time, she gave several testimonies, the first of which was for the Documentation campaign. She was also a witness at the trial of Karl Rahm, the former commander of the Terezín Ghetto. Her testimony was also used in the Nuremberg trials.

zoom_in
4

Document Text

  1. English
  2. Czech
insert_drive_file
Text from page1

Statement

written with Valerie Straussová, née Kantorová, born 25. 6. 1907, former prisoner of the Theresienstadt, Auschwitz, Schlesiersee concentration camps, currently residing in Prague XII., on Horní stromka 5.

I, the undersigned Valerie Straussová, née Kantorová, born 25. 6. 1907 in Vienna, daughter of Evžen and Emilie Kantorovi, citizen of Czechoslovakia, residing in Prague XII, on Horní stromka 5, am giving, after my return on July 13th, 1945, from various concentration camps, this true and faithful account of my experiences. I swear on my honor that I have neither invented nor exaggerated the statement that I am about to give.

On February 12th, 1942, I was transported to the ghetto in Theresienstadt, where I remained until October 4th, 1944. In Theresienstadt, I worked in a haberdasher's workshop, as a cleaning lady in the SS command, as a typist in the hospital, and I spent two months doing forest work in Křivoklát. My husband worked in Theresienstadt as a musician in a coffeehouse. On September 28th, 1944, he left Theresienstadt on a transport. We were told that the men were going one hour away from Theresienstadt to work in Germany. A week later, as his wife, I was placed on a transport and I left thinking that I would be reunited with him. All of the women pushed their way onto the train and each of us was happy to have been selected. Many children also went with us. When we approached Dresden, we prepared to disembark. How great was our disappointment when we rode through Dresden without stopping and saw that we were going east. Instead of riding for an hour, we rode for twenty-four until we reached the Auschwitz train station. Here, we had to get off the train without our luggage and the selection process took place right in front of the train: women with children and the elderly on the right, us childless women on the left. At the time, we still didn’t know what being sent to the right meant (the gas chamber). We were taken to the washrooms, where everything we had on was taken away, our heads were shaved, we were led to the showers, and clothed in old rags. And then the familiar, nerve-wrenching life in the concentration camp began. After 5 days, we went through another selection and were taken to the train. We were given better clothing and sent to work in Germany. We rode until we reached the Schlesiersee train station in northeast Silesia, not far from the Polish border. From the station we walked for about 2 hours. They put us up in two farms, 1,000 women in each building. They housed us in two large barns for storing hay. The next morning, we were given shovels and spades and we dug 3 ½ meters deep anti-tank trenches. It was extremely hard work for us women and there was very little food, and so we quickly lost a lot of weight. At the end of October, one of the girls bumped into my leg with a wheelbarrow. I had a small scrape that I didn’t think was serious. Several days later, my leg started hurting, swelled up, and developed a small phlegmon. It gradually got worse and the doctor had to operate on me in the barn. After the incision, my high fever came down, but I couldn’t stand on my leg, and so for three weeks I crawled around on all fours. As soon as I got better, I was sent to perform domestic labor. I peeled potatoes. I would get up at 4 in the morning and peeled potatoes until the evening. Two days later, I developed a fever of 40 degrees, shooting pain on the right side of my chest, and I started coughing. The doctor diagnosed me with pneumonia. Since wrapping my chest would have been impossible in the cold barn and there was no medicine in the camp, I was left to my own fate. I was not allowed to lie down, and so I sat, leaning against the icy wall of the stable wearing only my clothes (coats and shoes were taken away from the sick and given to the healthy). I was covered with a camp-issued blanket. Ten days later, my pneumonia disappeared as if by a miracle, but the injury on my leg got worse and started to fester. Around January 10th, the sick were moved into quickly built wooden barracks. Before we moved, we had to hand over everything we wore and wash ourselves so that we wouldn’t bring lice, which we were completely infested with, into the new building. We entered the building completely naked and they promised to disinfect our clothes and give them back to us. Washing, however, didn’t rid us of lice.

insert_drive_file
Text from page2

Our situation was much improved in the barracks. We slept in bunk beds on straw mattresses, two to a bed and covered by a single blanket. We were so cold. On January 22nd, we heard that the battlefront was only 20 km away from us. There were rumors that we would be evacuated. Sick women were to remain in the camp. We were happy and hoped that the Russians would liberate us soon. But we rejoiced too soon. At about 7 o’clock in the evening, a German commander entered and ordered everyone to evacuate, including the seriously ill. The situation was desperate, because all of us were lying in bed completely naked. We started to panic and each of us tried to find something to wear. I begged our superior for some clothes, but it was all in vain. At the last minute, one of the nurses gave me a summer dress that I threw over my naked body. I wound strips ripped from a blanket around my legs, even though this was sabotage, and I managed to snag 2 blankets. I tied one around my waist like a skirt, and wrapped the other around my shoulders. I was given a pair of clogs. Many women were barefoot and their feet became frostbitten. When we walked out into the courtyard we could barely stand up. It was freezing and there was a lot of snow. For our journey, they gave us a loaf of bread that was supposed to last us three days. Then they filled us into lines of 5 and the march began. I wasn’t able to walk because I had been sick in bed for almost 10 weeks, but the Schupo kept forcing me and threatening to shoot me. And so we marched all night until the afternoon of the next day. On the way, many of us died or froze to death. At 3 o’clock the next day we came to a forest that was about 4 km before Ostweide. The commander ordered all of the sick to sit down. A vehicle would be coming from Ostweide to pick them up soon. The healthy continued marching. I sat down on the edge of the forest by a ditch and was happy that I didn’t have to keep going. I believed that the vehicle would arrive, although others claimed that something else would happen. There were about 40 of us here, in addition to the doctor, who took down our names. There were also 2 corpses. About 60 m from the edge of the forest, the Schupo were digging a hole. I thought that it was for our 2 corpses. When it got dark and we had given up all hope that the vehicle would come, 2 Schupo came up to us, grabbed about six women and forced them toward the hole, shouting arbeitenarbeiten. The women screamed and wanted to escape, but then we heard shots and then silence. Now we knew for sure that there was no vehicle and what truly awaited us. After a while, the Schupo came for the next 6 victims. I was part of the 3rd group. I was reconciled with my fate and was absolutely calm. A Schupo came up to me, grabbed me by the shoulder, and shouted: Komm. I said to him: Just a moment, I’ll just give my bread and blanket to the doctor to hand out to the others since I won’t be needing them anymore. He answered, seeing that I was totally calm: You may. And so I went up to the doctor and thanked her for her work and for treating me and gave her the rest of my bread and the blanket. I then walked peacefully with my murderer up to the hole. About 13 corpses lay in it. He made several women sit down on the mound of earth dug from the hole, and ordered me and two other women to turn our backs to him. First, he shot the women by the hole and then it was our turn. I stood in the middle. It was a beautiful moonlit night. I gazed up at the moon and thought to myself: what a pity that I have to die and nobody will ever know what happened here. It was at this moment that I finally understood how beautiful it is to be alive, even after all that we’d been through. And then a shot rang out and the woman to my right fell to the ground. And then a second shot and I felt a sharp pain on the left side of my neck. I collapsed onto the ground, but never lost consciousness. It felt strange to not be dead yet, but waiting for death. I soon realized that the shot had not been fatal. I felt the blood flowing from my wound and I quickly placed a hand on my neck. It all happened within an instant. In the meantime, the woman on my left side was shot. I began to be afraid that I would be buried alive. I heard the conversation between two of the Schupo who had shot us and were now standing right behind me. They had a very interesting conversation. One wanted to throw us into the hole right away, and the second said that they needed to wait until all of us were dead, and then the doctor would strip us and throw us into the hole. The seriously ill ones, who were brought here on wheelbarrows, those we’ll beat to death with our rifle butts, said one of the Schupo. When their conversation was over, they walked away from the hole to bring more victims from the edge of the forest. Without thinking, I turned over and crawled away into the forest on all fours. I thought to myself that it’s better if they shoot me again if they find me than to be buried alive. The night was clear and we were in a forest with tall trees, and so there was nowhere for me to hide. I crawled a couple meters away from the hole and hid behind a tree. Now, I began to be upset. I saw the Schupo force more women toward the hole. I heard shots and realized that they didn’t know I was missing and weren’t even looking for me. I heard them finish their

insert_drive_file
Text from page3

task, strip the women, throw them into the hole, and fill up the hole. I don’t know what happened to the doctor. Then I must have fallen asleep, because I didn’t see them walk away from the hole. I woke up and saw from a distance the Schupo walking down the road with a wheelbarrow likely loaded with clothes taken from the people who were shot. I knew that I was saved. I started walking away. I went around the hole and crossed the main road that goes from Schlesiersee to Ostweide. In the afternoon, I observed German tanks riding away from the forest on the other side of the road. I thought that the frontline must be there and that I would meet up with the Russians any minute. And so I headed out on this road. After walking for about 10 minutes, I saw a large haystack on the side of the road. I crawled inside of it and soon fell asleep. I was exhausted. We had marched the whole previous night, my leg was badly hurting, and to top it off my new neck wound, which hurt a little the first day. I slept until the morning and then headed out again. I walked through beautiful forests, along tank tracks, and didn’t meet a soul. I was terribly tired, but I was afraid to sit down in the snow. I didn’t want to fall asleep and freeze to death. As the evening approached, I chanced upon a crumbling barn for hay, where I spent the night. In the morning, I walked on and around noon I finally entered a small village, utterly exhausted. I went into the first house and asked if they would allow me to rest here. I was delighted to hear that I was in Poland. They gave me food and the next day the mayor took care of me. We burned my clothes, which were soaked with blood, and they gave me warm clothing, a dress, and blankets. I was given a room in a house that the Germans had abandoned. Polish girls lit the fire in my room and brought me food. The village didn’t have a doctor. Every day, a nurse came to check up on me and changed the bandages on my leg and neck. I was in great pain and couldn’t sleep at night. Five days after my arrival in the village, i.e. a week after I was injured, the Russians came to the village and I was finally truly liberated. A week later, a Polish nurse took me to the hospital in Wolstein. Fourteen days after I was shot was the first time I received medical assistance. I felt much better in the hospital, I quickly recuperated, and my wounds healed up. On March 18th, the Russians picked me up from the hospital and took me to Schwiebus, where I helped out in the hospital. I remained in the service of a Russian unit that rode out to assist the Russian Army in combat. After my military service, I was discharged from duty and taken to the repatriation committee in Prague in July.

Once in Prague, I found out that neither my husband, nor my parents, and neither my sister nor her husband, had returned. Only my brother came back. Before I left for Theresienstadt, I worked in an insurance office, and I plan on working there again.

I know the exact location where the 40 women were executed, and I am willing to show it to the relevant authorities.

Valerie Straussová

In Prague on July 23rd, 1945

insert_drive_file
Text from page4

Statement accepted by:

Berta Gerzonová 

Signature of witnesses:

Marta Fischerová

Dita Saxlová

On behalf of the Documentation campaign:

Scheck

On behalf of the archive:

Tresssler

insert_drive_file
Text from page1

Protokol

sepsaný s Valerií Straussovou, roz. Kantorovou, nar. 25. 6. 1907, bývalým vězněm z koncentračních táborů Terezín, Osvětím, Schlesiersee, t. č. bytem v Praze XII., v Horní stromce 5.

Já podepsaná Valerie Straussová, roz. Kantorová, nar. 25. 6. 1907 ve Vídni, dcera Evžena a Emilie Kantorových, československá občanka, bytem v Praze XII, v Horní stromce 5. podávám po své návratu dne 13. července 1945 z různých koncentračních táborů toto pravdivé vylíčení svých osudů. Prohlašuji na svoji čest, že jsem nic nepřidala a nic nevymyslela.

Dne 12. 2. 1942 odjela jsem transportem do ghetta v Terezíně, kde jsem pobyla až do 4. 10. 1944. V Terezíně jsem pracovala v galanterní dílně, jako uklízečka v komandatuře, jako protokolantka v ambulanci a byla jsem též na dvouměsíční lesní práci v Křivoklátě. Můj muž byl v Terezíně zaměstnán jako hudebník v kavárně. Dne 28. září 1944 odjel z Terezína transportem. Řeklo se nám, že muži odjíždějí hodinu za Terezín na práci do Německa. O týden později jsem byla jako jeho žena povolána do transportu a odjela jsem v domněnce, že jedu za ním. Všechny ženy se tlačily jako divé do vlaku a každá byla šťastná, když se tam dostala. Jelo s námi též mnoho dětí. Když jsme se blížili k Drážďanům, chystali jsme se k vystupování. Jaké bylo však naše zklamání, když jsme Drážďany přejeli a viděli jsme, že jedeme na východ. Jeli jsme místo jedné, dvacet čtyři hodiny, až jsme stanuli ve stanici Osvětím. Tam museli jsme vystoupiti bez zavazadel a hned před vlakem nastalo třídění: ženy s dětmi a staří vpravo, my bezdětní vlevo. Tenkráte jsme ještě nevěděli, co to znamená vpravo (plynová komora). Byly jsme odvedeny do umýváren, kde nám byly odňaty všechny naše věci, které jsme měly na sobě, byly jsme ostříhány do hola, odvedeny pod sprchy a oblečeny do starých hadrů. Potom nastal všem již dobře známý, nervy trhající v koncentračním táboře. Po 5 dnech byly jsme znovu tříděny a odvedeny k vlaku. Dostaly jsme potom lepší hadry a byly jsme poslány na práci do Německa. Jely jsme do stanice Schlesiersee v severovýchodním Slezsku, nedaleko polských hranic. Ze stanice šly jsme asi 2 hodiny pěšky a byly jsme umístěny na dvou statcích po 1.000 ženách. Ubytovaly nás do dvou velkých stodol na slámu. Hned příští den ráno dostaly jsme lopaty a rýče a šly jsme kopat zákopy proti tankům, 3 ½ metrů hluboké. Pro nás ženy to byla velmi těžká práce, jídla jsme dostávaly velmi málo, takže jsme záhy velmi zhubly. Koncem října najela mi jedna dívka při práci trakařem na nohu. Měla jsem malou odřeninu, které jsem nevěnovala pozornost. Za několik dnů mně však noha velmi rozbolela, opuchla a vznikla malá flegmóna. Tato se zhoršila a lékařka mi musela ve stodole provést operativní zákrok. Vysoká horečka po incizi klesla, nemohla jsem však vůbec stoupnout na nohu a tři neděle jsem lezla po čtyřech. Jakmile mi bylo trochu lépe, musela jsem na domácí práce. Loupala jsem brambory. Ve 4 hodiny ráno jsem vstávala a do večera jsem musela loupat. Za dva dny jsem dostala 40 stupňů horečky, velké píchání na pravé straně na prsou, kašel a lékařka konstatovala zápal plic. Jelikož zábaly ve studené stodole nebyly možné a medikamentů v táboře nebylo, byla jsem přenechaná osudu. Neměla jsem ležet. Seděla jsem tedy opřena o ledovou zeď stodoly v šatech. (Pláště a boty byly nemocným odňaty pro zdravé) Přikrytá jsem byla erární přikrývkou. Po 10 dnech zápal plic jako zázrakem zmizel, zato ale se zhoršila rána na noze, která velmi hnisala. Asi 10. ledna byly nemocné přestěhovány do rychle postaveného dřevěného baráku. Před stěhováním musely jsme odevzdati vše, co jsme měly na sobě a umýti se, abychom do baráku nepřinesly vši, kterých jsme tehdy měly nadbytek. Do nového baráku šly jsme tedy úplně nahé a bylo nám slíbeno, že šaty po desinfekci zase dostaneme. Umytím jsme se vší ovšem nezbavily.

insert_drive_file
Text from page2

V baráku to bylo už mnohem lepší. Spaly jsme na palandách na slamnících, vždy dvě a dvě přikryté jednou dekou. Byla nám strašná zima. 22. ledna jsme slyšely, že fronta je vzdálená od nás jen 20 km. Mluvilo se o evakuaci. Nemocné ženy mají zůstat v táboře. Byly jsme šťastná a doufaly jsme, že nás Rusové brzy osvobodí. Těšily jsme se však příliš záhy. Asi v 7 h večer vešel německý komandant a nařídil evakuaci všech přítomných, i těžce nemocných. Situace byla zoufalá, protože jsme ležely všechny nahé. Nastala velká panika a každá se snažila opatřit si něco. Prosila jsem naši představenou o nějaké šaty, ale marně. V poslední chvíli darovala mi jedna z ošetřovatelek letní šatečky, které jsem navlékla na nahé tělo. Na nohy omotala jsem si kusy pokrývky, ačkoli to byla sabotáž a šťastnou náhodou ulovila jsem 2 pokrývky. Jednu uvázala jsem si do pasu jako sukni, druhou jsem si dala přes ramena. Dostala jsem taky dřeváky. Mnoho žen šlo na boso a omrzly jim nohy. Když jsme vešly na dvůr, držely jsme se sotva na nohou. Byl velký mráz a mnoho sněhu. Na cestě nám dali jeden chléb, který byl určen na 3 dny. Pak nás seřadili do 5stupů a nastal pochod. Nemohla jsem jít, protože jsem před tím ležela skoro 10 neděl, Schupo mně však stále proháněl a hrozil zastřelením. Tak jsme pochodovaly celou noc až do příštího dne odpoledne. Na cestě mnoho z nás zemřelo nebo zmrzlo. Ve 3 hodiny příštího odpoledne přišly jsem k lesíku, 4 km před Ostweide. Komandant nařídil, všem nemocným, aby si sedli, že brzy přijede pro ně z Ostweide vůz. Zdravé pokračovaly v pochodu. Usedla jsem na okraj lesa do příkopu a byla jsem ráda, že nemusím dále. Věřila jsem, že vůz přijede, ačkoliv jiné tvrdily, že se stane něco jiného. Zůstalo nás tam asi 40 a lékařka, která si zapsala naše jména. Měly jsme s sebou taky 2 mrtvoly. Asi 60 m od kraje lesa kopali Schupo nějakou jámu. Domnívala jsem se, že je to pro naše 2 mrtvoly. Když se však setmělo a my jsme se už vzdaly, že vůz přijede, přiskočili 2 Schupo k nám, chytli asi 6 žen a hnali je voláním arbeitenarbeiten k jámě. Ženy křičely a chtěly utéci, v tom jsme však slyšely výstřely a pak ticho. Teď jsme věděly, že vůz nikdy nepřijede a co nás čeká. Za chvíli přišli si Schupo pro dalších 6 obětí. Byla jsem ve 3. skupině. Smířila jsem se s osudem a byla jsem naprosto klidná. Schupo přišel ke mně, chytl mně za rameno a řval: Komm. Řekla jsem mu: Okamžik, dám jen chléb a pokrývku lékařce pro druhé, vždyť to už nebudu potřebovat. Odvětil mi, vida, že jsem zcela klidná: To můžeš. Šla jsem tedy k lékařce, poděkovala jsem jí za práci, kterou měla s mým vyléčením a předala jsem jí zbytek chleba a pokrývku. Šla jsem pak klidně se svým vrahem k jámě. Tam leželo asi již 13 mrtvol. Posadil několik žen na vykopanou hlínu z jámy, mně a dvěma ženám rozkázal, abychom se obrátily k němu zády. Nejdříve zastřelil ženy u jámy a pak přišla řada na nás. Stála jsem uprostřed. Byla krásná měsíční noc. Hleděla jsem na měsíc a myslela jsem si: jaká škoda, že musím zemřít a nikdo se nedozví, co se v těchto místech stalo. Teď teprve jsem chápala, jak je krásné žít, přesto všechno, co jsme již prodělaly. V tom výstřel a moje sousedka vpravo se skácela k zemi. Druhý výstřel a ucítila jsem prudkou bolest v šíji na pravé straně. Skácela jsem se k zemi, ani na moment ale nepozbyla vědomí. Bylo mi divné, že nejsem mrtvá a čekala jsem na smrt. Za chvíli ale jsem poznala, že výstřel nebyl smrtelný. Cítila jsem, jak krev mi teče z rány a položila jsem ruku rychle pod šíji. To trvalo okamžik. Mezitím byla sousedka na levé straně již zastřelena. Dostala jsem strašný strach, že budu zaživa zakopána. Slyšela jsem rozmluvu dvou střílejících Schupo, kteří stáli těsně za mnou. Jejich rozmluva byla zajímavá. Jeden nás chtěl hodit ihned do jámy, druhý zase říkal, až budou všechny mrtvé, až pak je lékařka svlékne a hodí do jámy. Těžce nemocné, které byly přivezeny na trakařích, umlátíme pažbou na trakaři, říkal jeden Schupo. Po této rozmluvě se vzdálili od jámy, aby si od kraje lesa přivedli další oběti. Bez rozmyšlení jsem se obrátila a odlézala jsem po všech čtyřech dále do lesa. Myslela jsem, že je lépe, když po mně střelí ještě jednou, najdou-li mě, je to lepší, než být zahrabána zaživa. Byla jasná noc a nalézali jsme se ve vysokém lese, takže jsem se nemohla dobře skrýt. Odlezla jsem jen několik metrů od jámy a skryla jsem se za strom. Teď teprve jsem byla rozčílená. Viděla jsem, jak Schupo žene k jámě další ženy. Slyšela jsem výstřely a poznala jsem, že mě vůbec nepostrádají, ba mně ani nehledají. Slyšela jsem, jak dokončovali své

insert_drive_file
Text from page3

dílo, jak ženy svlékali, házeli do jámy a jámu zahazovali. Co se stalo s lékařkou jsem nevěděla. Pak jsem asi usnula, protože jsem neviděla, jak odcházeli od jámy. Probudila jsem se a viděla jsem z dálky po silnici jít Schupo s trakaři, na kterých měli asi naložené šatstvo po zastřelených. Věděla jsem, že jsem zachráněná. Vydala jsem se na cestu. Obešla jsem jámu a přešla státní silnici, která vede ze Schlesiersee do Ostweide. Odpoledne jsem pozorovala, že jezdí protější silnicí od lesa německé tanky. Myslela jsem, že je tam fronta a že tam co nevidět potkám Rusy. Dala jsem se tedy touto silnicí. Šla jsem asi 10 minut, když jsem viděla na kraji silnice velkou hromadu slámy. Rozhrnula jsem slámu vlezla jsem do hromady a brzy jsem usnula. Byla jsem vyčerpaná. Celou minulou noc jsme pochodovaly, noha strašně bolela, k tomu ještě nová rána na šíji, která první den málo bolela. Spala jsem až do rána, pak jsem se vydala na cestu. Šla jsem krásnými lesy, podle tankových kolejí a nikoho jsem nepotkávala. Byla jsem strašně unavená, bála jsem se ale sednout si do sněhu, abych neusnula a neumrzla. K večeru jsem našla rozbořenou stodolu se slámou, ve které jsem přenocovala. Ráno jsem šla dále a teprve k poledni došlo jsem úplně vyčerpaná do malé vísky. Šla jsem do prvního domku s prosbou, smím-li si tam odpočinout a ke své radosti jsem shledala, že jsem v Polsku. Dali mi jídlo a příští den se o mně postaral starosta. Šaty, které byly prosáklé krví jsme spálili a darovali mi teplé prádlo, šaty a přikrývky. Dostala jsem přidělenou místnost v domě, který Němci opustili. Polská děvčata mně zatopila v pokoji a nosila mi jídlo. Lékaře ve vesnici nebylo. Každý den chodila ale ke mně ošetřovatelka, která mi vyměňovala obvazy na noze a na šíji. Měla jsem velké bolesti, v noci jsem nemohla spát. 5 dní po mém příchodu do vesnice, t. j. týden po mém poranění přišli Rusové do vesnice a byla jsem konečně úplně osvobozena. Týden později převezla mně polská ošetřovatelka do nemocnice ve Wolsteině. Měla jsem tedy 14 dní po mém postřelení první odbornou lékařskou pomoc. V nemocnici jsem se měla velmi dobře, rychle jsem se zotavovala a rány se mi hojily. 18. března převzali mně z nemocnice Rusové a odvezli mně do Schwiebusu, kde jsem pak pomáhala v nemocnici. Zůstala jsem pak ve službách ruského komanda, které jezdilo za bojující ruskou armádou. Po skončení vojny byla jsem ze služeb propuštěna a dopravena repatriačním výborem do Prahy v červenci.

V Praze jsem zjistila, že se mi nevrátil manžel, ani rodiče a ani sestra s mužem. Vrátil se mi pouze bratr. Před svým odjezdem do Terezína pracovala jsem v kanceláři pojišťovny, kde hodlám zase pracovat.

Znám přesně místo popravy 40 žen a jsem ochotná toto místo příslušným orgánům ukázat.

Valerie Straussová

V Praze dne 23. července 1945

insert_drive_file
Text from page4

Protokol přijala:

Berta Gerzonová

Podpis svědků:

Marta Fischerová

Dita Saxlová

Za Dokumentační akci přijal:

Scheck

Za archiv přijal:

Tresssler

References

  • Updated 9 months ago
The Czech lands (Bohemia, Moravia and Czech Silesia) were part of the Habsburg monarchy until the First World War, and of the Czechoslovak Republic between 1918 and 1938. Following the Munich Agreement in September 1938, the territories along the German and Austrian frontier were annexed by Germany (and a small part of Silesia by Poland). Most of these areas were reorganized as the Reichsgau Sudetenland, while areas in the West and South were attached to neighboring German Gaue. After these terr...
This collection originated as a documentation of the persecution and genocide of Jews in the Czech lands excluding the archival materials relating to the history of the Terezín ghetto, which forms a separate collection. The content of the collection comprises originals, copies and transcripts of official documents and personal estates, as well as prints, newspaper clippings, maps, memoirs and a small amount of non-written material. The Documents of Persecution collection is a source of informati...