Erika Wolfová, on the Prague support project

Metadata

Erika Wolfová describes the support project, in which some members of the youth Zionist movement in Prague were involved. Their main task was to help with parcels and remain in written contact with deported Jews and the Zionist movement abroad. She highlights the important role of Heinz Prossnitz.

zoom_in
4

Document Text

  1. English
  2. German
insert_drive_file
Text from page1

sent by Erika Wolf, born. 29. I. 1921 in Wroclaw, living in Prague I., Královodvorská 14., nationality: Jewish.

When the last transports of full Jews left Prague in July 1943, we 3 chaverim of the youth movement stayed behind. On the one hand, our task was to help with parcels and, on the other hand, to remain in written contact with the evacuees and with the movement abroad. The correspondence was handled by Heinz Prossnitz until his departure in October 1944, as he usually did by far the largest part of the work with uncomparable dedication and self-sacrifice. The main purpose of the correspondence was to carefully write to as many addresses in Switzerland as possible, to which parcels were sent from there. Soon after the transport’s departure, the previously unrestricted parcel traffic with Theresienstadt was lifted and the first registration stamps for 20 kg parcels arrived. Since the correct sender had to be listed, we were afraid that we could be punished because of the many things we bought unofficially. In addition, many stamps were sent to our addresses at the same time, so we had to look for people in T. to whose name they were allowed to send stamps. How could any of us have been explained having about 150 kg of food a month, when a Jew did not even have enough to eat on his own? But strangely, the Germans had no interest in such obvious transgressions. But after all, they did not need a reason to lock us up. Now the restriction on approval stamps applied only in the Protectorate, one could continue to send things freely from the Reich. So we looked for people in the Sudeten and in the Reich, to whom we sent ready-made packets to forward on. Also, Noemi, who did not have to wear a star, obtained an entry pass and even drove a few car boots full of parcels into the Sudeten.

In about January, 1944, the first news came from Birkenau - Auschwitz, also requesting parcels. Only food that was ready to eat was suitable, we mostly sent bread. Very few messages came through, and those that did were wildly contradictory, so we were always in the dark as to whether they got the parcels at all and what they got, which of course created a lot of problems. Today I believe that only a small part actually arrived. And then around May the first news about the gassings came via English radio, so again, we did even not know who was still alive. Then, no more news came from there. Around July information arrived from many sides that the postal service with Upper Silesia was longer working and so we stopped the shipments to Birkenau.

Now for something about our difficulties. First, there was the food supply. We had quite a few so-called smugglers who supplied us with food, but it was never enough. And if there was some flour somewhere, then there was no fat to be had, or jam. Once we were flooded with legumes and a month later there were none at all. So we always had to ask and beg from one smuggler to another, and we were put off until the next day, when once again there was still nothing there for some reason. And so most of our time was lost on errands. We couldn't take large quantities home either; our families were too afraid and not without cause. The gentlemen of the religious community were too afraid to let us use a room there. Often, therefore, we had to postpone parcels, and sometimes couldn’t send them at all, because we lacked the most necessary food to put in them.

insert_drive_file
Text from page2

The second crucial difficulty was the money supply, my special task. At the beginning, there was still money left over that our departing Chaverim had gotten from abroad. But when that ran out, the ordeal began for the remaining 3 Zionists. They still had Zionist money, but each one sent me to the next. Finally, the last reserves were with our Jewish elder and known Zionist, František Friedmann. A grubby financier, one had to use cunning to pull even a crown from his purse. It cost me many difficult and often unsuccessful attempts, for which I had employ all the diplomatic arts I could muster. I had to remind him and repeatedly awaken his empathy for the hungry, to convince him of the importance of the parcels, in order to extract K 3,000 from him if I was lucky. And even that was a success, because when the other two Zionists had asked him for money, they were immediately sent away with the assurance that he had absolutely nothing at present. But what K 3,000, - were worth, in the best case 2 times in 3 weeks, can be measured by the fact that 1 kg fat cost K 1500-, margarine from K 500- to K 1000-, and lately jam K 150, - , sugar K 300, - 1 kg. So we had to save and save, send inferior food and fewer parcels, and those that we did send were often very sad. We tried to get money in other ways, by selling books from the Zion. Library and KKL stamps, but those were all drops in the bucket. Money was our eternal problem and grief, because without it we could not always fully exploit the opportunity to help. We only sent this money to certain Machsan addresses at Theresienstadt, and in other places where there was no Machsan, to every Zionist who was in our directory.

One more difficulty, but thank God we got over it, was the danger of the whole affair at every turn. Jews’ bags would sometimes be searched. We carried forbidden foods on a daily basis, and usually in noticeably large quantities such as 20 kg of flour, a large bucket of jam, legumes. Negotiating in the shops, our whole relationship with the smugglers, was dangerous and it is our luck that none of them was ever caught. Then Jews were not allowed to send letters abroad or parcels to the Reich, could not enter the post office, were only allowed to shop from 3-5 pm and of course that was not always possible. We had to cover the star though even the starless ones who were packing the parcels with us, of course, were already known in the surrounding area and the various post offices, due to the large quantities that we sent regularly.

In August 1944 a camp for all the Jewish parts of mixed marriages from the Protectorate was established in Prague. Since I worked there, I also supplied them with food as best I could. The attitude of these so-called aryan clan Jews to Judaism was interesting. Of course, it was focused on assimilation, as far as they thought about it at all and especially with the women, it was already at a very advanced stage. The best proof of how lost they are to Judaism came at Christmas, which of course was celebrated. With fun by those with lighter natures and with tears about the separation from family, for the more serious ones. You could see that the deeper relationship to the holiday was missing - they could not really find the right form in which to celebrate - but you could see what an impact family and habits had had. And yet, when they came back from Theresienstadt, many of these women told me that they had connected this time and their experiences with the Jews. This is not an advantage for these people, as it means alienation from their own family, but that is how our typical Jewish destiny has left its mark even on the apostates.

insert_drive_file
Text from page3

Now to the parcel actions. In the autumn some news came from girls from Hamburg and from boys from Schwarzheide, to whom we could send things. There was also an action of the religious community, which sent large quantities of food and clothing to Schwarzheide, which was even approved by the Central Offices for Jewish Issues. Then the transports left from Theresienstadt and the Machsan parcels ceased almost completely. Unfortunately, it took away the last full Jews, who were previously indispensable to the religious community, including Heinz Prossnitz. With him, who died in the gas a few days later, we lost our main initiator, the best comrade, the most helpful and selfless man I have ever met in my life. On the day before Prossnitz’s departure, in the to-do surrounding the packages, two Swiss sent by the Geneva Hechaluz appeared with 20.000, - Dollars. But, in his excitement, Mr. Prossnitz did not know what to do with it and sent the money back. After his departure Noemi and I felt very sorry about that, because we needed it very much and so we wrote to Switzerland, of course camouflaged as family stories. 2 months later, a Czech appeared with 20,000 francs. Unfortunately, we did not have much opportunity to send parcels with the money, because one month later the postal traffic to the Reich was discontinued. That was the end of our work. But we already saw new uses for the money.

On February 4, the first Chaverah, who had escaped from the Russians when she changed camps, came to see me. Skin and bones, with short, louse-ridden hair stubble, sick feet and some rags, she passed herself off as a refugee German, was given some dresses by the German aid organization and had them sent to Prague. Since it was impossible for us to accommodate her, she returned to the train station the next day, recovered in a German hospital for six weeks and was then sent to a Czech village where she lived in her role until the end of the war. With her we got the first authentic news about Theresienstadt, the hells of Auschwitz, the so-called labour camp, the death marches on the run from the enemy. Then we became aware of how powerless we had been with our few parcels against this decisive will to exterminate. Only very, very few lives could be saved despite the goodwill of all those who helped us from abroad with money and parcels and from the Reich with parcel brokering. But maybe we were able to give people a little joy for the last time in their lives with them.

I would like to give approximate statistics to the best of my knowledge and belief. The numbers include our private parcels.

about 220 X 20 kg - parcels to Theresienstadt: 4,400 kg

6 months 60 parcels weekly of 2 kg: 3,120 kg Birkenau and Litzmannstadt

about 6 months about 16 parcels weekly á 2 kg: 830 kg to Theresienstadt via Germany

4 months Hamburg and Schwarzheide (also clothes): 600 kg

Total: 8,950 kg

Given the fact that we were only 3 people, who worked all day, and because of the shortages of money and food, the quantities are ridiculously small compared to what would have been necessary. But thank God we were not the only ones who tried to help, most of the Jews who stayed behind who weren’t sent away until the last few months and their non-Jewish spouses helped in their circle as much as they could. And as the Chaverim always wrote us, a parcel meant not just material help, but also spiritual. We felt that

insert_drive_file
Text from page4

in Prague, too, when a letter, once a packet and then the money came: We are not completely abandoned, not all of humanity hates us, but our people still live on in the rest of the world, they feel with us and will help us wherever they can. And much, much more help is needed until we are saved from our eternal Jewish destiny.

Podpis:

Erika Wolfová

Protokol přijal:

Berta Gerzonová

Podpis svědků:

Kratková

Za Dokumentační akci přijal:

9. IX. 1945

Scheck

Za archiv přijal:

Alex. Schmiedt

insert_drive_file
Text from page1

Protokoll

eingesandt von Erika Wolf, geb. 29. I. 1921 in Breslau, wohnhaft in Prag I., Královodvorská 14., Nationalität: jüdisch.

Als im Juli 1943 die letzten Transporte der Volljuden aus Prag abgingen, blieben wir noch 3 Chaverim der Jugendbewegung zurück. Unsere Aufgabe war nun einerseits mit Paketen zu helfen und andererseits in schriftlicher Verbindung mit den evakuierten und mit der Bewegung im Ausland zu bleiben. Die Korrespondenz übernahm bis zu seiner Abreise im Oktober 1944 Heinz Prossnitz, so wie er auch sonst den weitaus größten Teil der Arbeit mit einer unvergleichlichen Hingabe und Selbstaufopferung geleistet hat. Der hauptsächliche Sinn der Korrespondenz bestand darin, dass wir vorsichtig soviel Adressen, wie nur möglich in die Schweiz schreiben, an die von dort aus Pakete gesandt wurden. Bald nach Abgang der Transporte wurde der bisher unbeschränkte Paketverkehr mit Theresienstadt aufgehoben und die ersten Zulassungsmarken auf 20 kg-Pakete kamen an. Da so der richtige Absender angegeben werden musste, hatten wir Angst, dass man uns wegen der vielen unter der Hand gekauften Sachen, bestrafen könnte. Außerdem kamen an unsere Adressen gleichzeitig sehr viel Marken, so dass wir Leute suchen mussten, an deren Namen die Marken von T. abgeschickt werden durften. Wie hätte jeder von uns ca. 150 kg Lebensmittel im Monat verantworten können, wenn ein Jude nicht einmal auf seine Karten allein genug zu essen hatte. Aber seltsamerweise hatten die Deutschen an solchen offensichtlichen Gesetzübertritten kein Interesse. Aber schließlich brauchten sie ja auch gar keinen Grund um uns einzusperren. Nun galt aber die Beschränkung auf Zulassungsmarken nur im Protektorat, aus dem Reich konnte man weiter frei schicken. So suchten wir uns Leute in den Sudeten und im Reich, denen wir fertige Päckchen zum Weiterbefördern hinschickten. Auch verschaffte sich Noemi, die keinen Stern tragen musste, einen Durchlassschein und fuhr selbst mit einigen Koffern voll Pakete in die Sudeten.

Etwa im Jänner 1944 kamen die ersten Nachrichten aus Birkenau - Auschwitz, die ebenfalls um Päckchen baten. Dorthin kamen nur fertige Esswaren in Frage, hauptsächlich schickten wir Brote. Es kamen aber sehr wenige Nachrichten und diese widersprechen sich sehr, sodass wir immer im Ungewissen waren, ob sie die Pakete überhaupt und was sie davon bekamen, was natürlich sehr viele Probleme schuf. Heute glaube ich, dass nur ein kleiner Teil angekommen ist. Dazu kamen etwa im Mai die ersten Nachrichten von den Vergasungen durch das englische Radio, sodass wir wieder nicht wussten, wer von den Leuten überhaupt noch lebte. Nachrichten von dort kamen dann überhaupt nicht mehr. Etwa im Juli kamen auch von vielen Seiten Informationen, dass der Postverkehr mit Oberschlesien nicht mehr klappe und so stellten wir auch dann die Sendungen nach Birkenau ein.

Nun etwas von unseren Schwierigkeiten. Da war erstens die Lebensmittelversorgung. Wir hatten etliche sogenannte Schleichhändler, die uns Lebensmittel verschafften, aber das war nie genug. Und gab es schon irgendwo Mehl, gab es wieder keine Fettstoffe, oder Marmelade. Einmal waren wir überflutet mit Hülsenfrüchten und nach einem Monat gab es schon gar keine mehr. So mussten wir immer von einem Schleichhändler zum anderen bitten und betteln, wurden auf den nächsten Tag vertröstet, an welchem es aus irgend einem Grund wieder noch nicht da war. Und so ging uns die meiste Zeit mit den Besorgungen verloren. Große Vorräte durften wir auch nicht nach Hause nehmen, davor hatten unsere Familie Angst und auch nicht unberechtigt. Uns einen Raum auf der Kultusgemeinde zur Verfügung zu stellen, hatten die Herren zuviel Angst. Oft mussten wir daher Pakete aufschieben, manchmal ganz ausfallen lassen, da uns die nötigsten Esswaren hinein fehlten.

insert_drive_file
Text from page2

Die zweite entscheidende Schwierigkeit war die Geldversorgung, meine spezielle Aufgabe. Am Anfang war noch Geld da, das unsere abfahrenden Chaverim aus dem Ausland bekommen haben. Doch als das zu Ende war, fingen die Leidenswege zu den restlichen 3 Zionisten an. Sie verfügten noch über zionistisches Geld, aber jeder schickte mich zu den anderen. Schließlich waren die letzten Reserven bei unserem Judenältesten und bekanntem Zionisten, František Friedmann. Ein geriebener Finanzmann, dem man wahrlich jede Krone mit List aus der Tasche ziehen musste. Viele schwere, oft erfolglose Gänge hat mich das gekostet, bei denen ich meine ganze diplomatische Kunst zusammennehmen musste. Ich musste bei ihm immer wieder Mitgefühl für die hungernden erwecken, ihn von der Wichtigkeit der Pakete überzeugen, um dann, bei viel Glück mit K 3.000,- abzuziehen. Und doch war das schon ein Erfolg, denn die anderen beiden Zionisten wurden bei einer Bitte um Geld sofort damit abgefertigt, dass er momentan absolut nichts habe. Aber was K 3.000,- im besten Fall 2 Mal in 3 Wochen waren, kann man ermessen, wenn 1 kg Fett K 1500,- kostete, Margarine von K 500,- bis K 1000,- und in letzter Zeit Marmelade K 150,-, Zucker K 300,- 1 kg. So mussten wir sparen und sparen, minderwertigere Esswaren und weniger Pakete schicken und das oft sehr traurig. Wir versuchten noch auf anderen Wegen zu Geld zu gelangen, indem wir Bücher aus der zion. Bibliothek und KKL Marken verkauften, aber das waren alles Tropfen auf den heißen Stein. Geld war unser ewiges Problem und Kummer, da wir dadurch die Möglichkeit zum Helfen nicht immer ganz ausnützen konnten. Von diesem Geld schickten wir nach Theresienstadt nur an die bestimmten Machsanadressen, in die anderen Orten, wo kein Machsan bestand, an jeden Zionisten, der in unserem Verzeichnis war.

Noch eine Schwierigkeit, über die wir aber Gott sei Dank heil hinweggekommen sind, war die Gefährlichkeit der ganzen Angelegenheit auf Schritt und Tritt. Es kam vor, dass Juden die Taschen untersucht wurden. Wir trugen täglich verbotene Lebensmittel und hauptsächlich große auffallende Mengen wie 20 kg Mehl, einen großen Marmeladenkübel, Hülsenfrüchte. Das Verhandeln in den Geschäften, unsere ganze Beziehung zu den Schleichhändlern war gefährlich und es ist unser Glück, dass keiner von ihnen die ganze Zeit über geschnappt wurde. Dann durften Juden keine Briefe ins Ausland und keine Pakete ins Reich schicken, die Post nicht betreten, nur von 3 - 5 h einkaufen und das alles ging natürlich nicht immer einzuhalten. So mussten wir oft den Stern verdecken und auch die sternlosen, die mit uns die Pakete aufgaben, waren natürlich schon in der Umgebung und den verschiedenen Postämtern bekannt, durch die regelmäßig großen Mengen, die wir aufgaben.

Im August 1944 wurde in Prag ein Lager für sämtliche jüdische Teile der Mischehen aus dem Protektorat errichtet. Da ich dort arbeitete, versorgte ich auch sie mit Esswaren so gut es ging. Interessant war die Einstellung dieser sogenannten arisch versippten Juden zum Judentum. Natürlich lautete sie auf Assimilation, soweit sie darüber überhaupt noch nachdachten und besonders bei den Frauen war sie schon sehr fortgeschritten. Den besten Beweis, wie verloren sie für das Judentum sind, bekam ich Weihnachten, welches natürlich gefeiert wurde. Lustig bei den leichteren Naturen und mit Weinen über die Trennung von der Familie, bei den ernsteren. Man sah, dass die tiefere Beziehung zu dem Feste fehlte - man fand eigentlich keine richtige Form zu der Feier - aber man sah doch, wie weit die Familie und die Gewohnheit gewirkt haben. Und doch haben mir etliche dieser Frauen, als sie aus Theresienstadt zurückkamen, erzählt, dass sie diese Zeit und die Erlebnisse mit den Juden verbunden haben. Das ist für diese Leute kein Vorteil, es bedeutet Entfremdung von der eigenen Familie, aber so hat unser typisches Judenschicksal auch den Abtrünnigen noch seinen Stempel aufgedrückt.

insert_drive_file
Text from page3

Nun noch zu den Paketaktionen. Im Herbst kamen einige Nachrichten von Mädchen aus Hamburg und von Jungen aus Schwarzheide, denen wir schicken konnten. Es bestand auch eine Aktion der Kultusgemeinde, die große Mengen von Lebensmitteln und Kleidung nach Schwarzheide schickten, die sogar von der Zentralstellen für Judenfragen bewilligt wurde. Dann gingen die Transporte aus Theresienstadt und damit hörten die Machsanpaket fast ganz auf. Leider fuhr mit den letzten Volljuden, die bisher auf der Kultusgemeinde unentbehrlich waren, auch Heinz Prossnitz. Mit ihm, der einige Tage später im Gas umkam, verloren wir unseren Hauptinitiator, den besten Kameraden, den hilfsbereitesten und selbstlosesten Menschen, den ich überhaupt in meinem Leben kennengelernt habe. Am Tage vor Prossnitz Abreise, erschienen in den größten Packrummel, 2 vom Genfer Hechaluz geschickte Schweizer mit 20.000,- Dollar. Doch Herr Prossnitz wusste in seiner Aufregung nicht, was er damit machen sollte und schickte das Geld zurück. Nach seiner Abreise tat es Noemi und mir sehr leid darum, da wir es sehr nötig gebraucht hätten und so schrieben wir darum in die Schweiz, natürlich in Familiengeschichten getarnt. 2 Monate später erschien ein Tscheche mit 20.000 Franc. Leider hatten wir nur noch wenig Gelegenheit von dem Geld Pakete zu schicken, denn einen Monat wurde der Postverkehr ins Reich eingestellt. Das war das Ende unserer Arbeit. Schon zeigte sich aber neue Verwendung für das Geld.

Am 4. Feber erschien bei mir die erste Chaverah, die bei der übersiedlung ihres Lagers den Russen, ausgerissen war. Auf die Knochen mager, mit kleinen, verlausten Haarstoppeln, kranken Füßen und einigen Fetzen, hatte sie sich als geflüchtete Deutsche ausgegeben, sich von der deutschen Hilfsorganisation einige Kleider geben und nach Prag schicken lassen. Da es uns unmöglich war sie unterzubringen, ging die am nächsten Tag wieder auf den Bahnhof, wurde erst 6 Wochen in einem deutschen Krankenhaus geheilt und dann in ein tschechisches Dorf verschickt, wo sie in ihrer Rolle bis Ende des Krieges lebte. Mit ihr bekamen wir die ersten authentischen Nachrichten über Theresienstadt, die Höllen von Auschwitz, den sogenannten Arbeitslager, den Todesmärschen auf der Flucht vor dem Feind. Da kam es uns zum Bewusstsein, wie ohnmächtig wir mit unseren paar Paketen diesem entschiedenen Vernichtungswillen gegenübergestanden hatten. Nur sehr, sehr wenige konnte leider der gute Wille all derer, die uns aus dem Ausland mit Geld und Paketen und aus dem Reich mit Paketenvermittlung geholfen haben, das Leben retten. Aber vielleicht konnten wir damit denen, die sterben mussten, in der letzten Zeit ihres Lebens eine kleine Freude bereiten.

Ich möchte nach bestem Wissen und Gewissen eine ungefähre Statistik geben. In den Zahlen sind unsere Privatpakete mit eingerechnet.

ca 220 20 kg-Pakete nach Theresienstadt: 4.400 kg

6 Monate wöchentlich ca 60 Pakete á 2 kg: 3.120 kg Birkenau und Litzmannstadt

ca 6 Monate wöchentlich ca 16 Pakete á 2 kg: 830 kg nach Theresienstadt über Deutschland

4 Monate Hamburg und Schwarzheide (auch Kleider): 600 kg

Insgesamt: 8.950 kg

Die Mengen sind dadurch, dass wir nur 3 waren, die den ganzen Tag gearbeitet haben, durch den Mangel an Geld und Lebensmittel, lächerlich klein gegen die, die nötig gewesen wären. Aber Gott sei Dank waren wir nicht die einzigen, die versucht haben zu helfen, die meisten der zürickgebliebenen Juden, die erst die letzten Monate wegkamen und ihre nicht jüdischen Ehegatten, haben in ihrem Kreis geholfen, wie sie nur konnten. Und wie uns die Chaverim immer schrieben, nicht nur materielle Hilfe, sondern auch seelische, bedeutete so ein Paket. Das Bewusstsein,

insert_drive_file
Text from page4

dass auch wir in Prag hatten, wenn ein Brief, einmal ein Päckchen und dann das Geld kam: Wir sind nicht ganz verlassen, nicht die ganze Menschheit hasst uns, sondern noch lebt unser Volk in der übrigen Welt, fühlt mit uns und wird uns immer helfen, wo es nur kann. Und noch viel, viel Hilfe ist notwendig, bis wir von diesem unserem ewigen Judenschicksal gerettet sein werden.

Podpis:

Erika Wolfová

Protokol přijal:

Berta Gerzonová

Podpis svědků:

Kratková

Za Dokumentační akci přijal:

9. IX. 1945

Scheck

Za archiv přijal:

Alex. Schmiedt

References

  • Updated 10 months ago
The Czech lands (Bohemia, Moravia and Czech Silesia) were part of the Habsburg monarchy until the First World War, and of the Czechoslovak Republic between 1918 and 1938. Following the Munich Agreement in September 1938, the territories along the German and Austrian frontier were annexed by Germany (and a small part of Silesia by Poland). Most of these areas were reorganized as the Reichsgau Sudetenland, while areas in the West and South were attached to neighboring German Gaue. After these terr...
This collection originated as a documentation of the persecution and genocide of Jews in the Czech lands excluding the archival materials relating to the history of the Terezín ghetto, which forms a separate collection. The content of the collection comprises originals, copies and transcripts of official documents and personal estates, as well as prints, newspaper clippings, maps, memoirs and a small amount of non-written material. The Documents of Persecution collection is a source of informati...